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  • #31
    Originally posted by Adam View Post
    Never been a big fan of limas. Love dumplings, though.
    Dumplings ok. Crack-er-barrel makes 'em.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Michele View Post
      We grew up on soups and casseroles during the week. Macaroni and cheese was a meal, not a side dish. Saturday was usually hamburgers or even meat sandwiches. A pot roast with vegetables or roasted chicken with stuffing was an early Sunday dinner. Salad and homemade bread was on our table every night along with a bowl of mashed potatoes...no potatoes with spaghetti. Summertime was filled with salmon and other fish, crab and clams. Looking at this menu, it's a wonder I was such a slight thing and no wonder why I crave carbs today. Still, I'm grateful for my mom's home-cooked foods.

      I still have a majority of these foods now (lacking on the precious fresh seafood but at least once a week) but the casseroles are probably deconstructed...I'll have the protein and vegetables by themselves minus the binder.

      Most hated food...liver. I loved smelling it cooking because my mom made it with bacon and onions but the texture and taste...🤢

      Most loved food...any carb with sauce or gravy. I really have to restrict myself because I could eat it for every meal, breakfast included. Which brings me to my question...do you eat leftovers?
      I always get a takeaway container for restaurant leftovers, but we don't eat them. On the way home, we hand them out the car window to anyone we see panhandling on the median.

      Our meals at home are pretty individualized - different schedules, different tastes, different health needs - so we seldom have leftovers., unless it's on purpose, like to have in a packed lunch the next day.
      "Think as I think," said a man,
      "Or you are abominably wicked;
      You are a toad."
      And after I had thought of it,
      I said: "I will, then, be a toad." - Stephen Crane

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by Michele View Post
        We grew up on soups and casseroles during the week. Macaroni and cheese was a meal, not a side dish. Saturday was usually hamburgers or even meat sandwiches. A pot roast with vegetables or roasted chicken with stuffing was an early Sunday dinner. Salad and homemade bread was on our table every night along with a bowl of mashed potatoes...no potatoes with spaghetti. Summertime was filled with salmon and other fish, crab and clams. Looking at this menu, it's a wonder I was such a slight thing and no wonder why I crave carbs today. Still, I'm grateful for my mom's home-cooked foods.

        I still have a majority of these foods now (lacking on the precious fresh seafood but at least once a week) but the casseroles are probably deconstructed...I'll have the protein and vegetables by themselves minus the binder.

        Most hated food...liver. I loved smelling it cooking because my mom made it with bacon and onions but the texture and taste...🤢

        Most loved food...any carb with sauce or gravy. I really have to restrict myself because I could eat it for every meal, breakfast included. Which brings me to my question...do you eat leftovers?
        I grew up similarly, but without the seafood. We'd have flounder every once in awhile. My grandmother made bacala, but I hated it. My grandmother would also make kidneys (also hated...but another favorite of my mother). We had liver and onions at least once a month (my mother called it "sliced beef" to try to trick us...I still hated it). And yes, macaroni and cheese was a meal. I hated that as well (my mother put a can of cream of mushroom soup in hers...it wasn't until college that I tried Kraft and loved it...took awhile to realize it was that cream of mushroom soup addition that did me in).

        Truth be told, as I kid I hated most foods. However, I was required to clean my plate. That started my eating habit of eating only one thing on my plate at a time until I finish it and then move on to the next. As I kid, that was my survival mechanism to get through dinner...eat the worst first and end with what was palatable. My sister ruined that for me one night when she suggest I mix the applesauce (my favorite thing on the plate of pork chop, wild rice, and applesauce) with the rice to get the rice down. It made the rice taste even worse and ruined the applesauce. I never listened to her again about how to get through a meal!
        Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
        Robert Southwell, S.J.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by Celeste Chalfonte View Post

          I always get a takeaway container for restaurant leftovers, but we don't eat them. On the way home, we hand them out the car window to anyone we see panhandling on the median.
          Thus............ violatng a number of food safety laws. pretty sure the panhandlers would much rather have some cash than left-over food somebody has already been eating off of.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Lady Marva View Post
            Thus............ violatng a number of food safety laws. pretty sure the panhandlers would much rather have some cash than left-over food somebody has already been eating off of.
            It is not a violation of any law.

            And I choose not to fund the purchase of drugs, alcohol or cigarettes by giving cash. Since I'm not obligated to give anything at all, that's my prerogative.

            I've never encountered a panhandler who wasn't grateful for the food. If I ever do, I would cordially invite him or her to join you in fucking off. For now, though, you're on your own.
            "Think as I think," said a man,
            "Or you are abominably wicked;
            You are a toad."
            And after I had thought of it,
            I said: "I will, then, be a toad." - Stephen Crane

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by Celeste Chalfonte View Post

              It is not a violation of any law.

              And I choose not to fund the purchase of drugs, alcohol or cigarettes by giving cash. Since I'm not obligated to give anything at all, that's my prerogative.

              I've never encountered a panhandler who wasn't grateful for the food. If I ever do, I would cordially invite him or her to join you in fucking off. For now, though, you're on your own.
              Ah, you have a food license? No? then, yeah it is.

              I've never encountered a panhandler who wasn't grateful for the food
              Stick around long enough to see them throw it in the trash? No you don't.
              Sure. Whatever you chose to give away is your perogative ... sort of like giving away chewed up bubble gum.

              Comment


              • #37
                Stop it. Celeste has been doing this for a while and it's obviously appreciated by those who receive it. Also, this is under Fun Stuff so leave it alone.
                May we raise children who love the unloved things - the dandelion, the worm, the spiderlings.
                Children who sense the rose needs the thorn and run into rainswept days the same way they turn towards the sun...
                And when they're grown and someone has to speak for those who have no voice,
                may they draw upon that wilder bond, those days of tending tender things and be the one.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Michele View Post
                  Stop it. Celeste has been doing this for a while and it's obviously appreciated by those who receive it. Also, this is under Fun Stuff so leave it alone.
                  What she said. Now, my experience is probably closer to 50/50 on that (I've never counted up numbers), and I used to give away my bus pass at the end of the month when I was done with it and I gave detailed instructions on how to get to the Nashville Union Rescue Mission, telling the recipient how to get there and that they would be able to take MTA anywhere in the city for the remainder of the month of April or whatever (they've since changed how those things work, but at the time if you bought a monthly pass, it was for the whole month, day or night, and you only had to pay a quarter upcharge to take an "express").

                  But concern about restaurant laws were about #78 on the list of things to worry about for a homeless person, well behind getting warm shelter on a very cold night, for example. Some will take it and get their lives turned around, and some won't, wanting cash for booze or (more commonly) some sort of drugs.

                  But every bit of that is, as Michele pointed out, not in the purview of this thread in this area. You started what was a fun thread about old-fashioned foods that we all may or may not have eaten at some point. Let's keep it that way. We can all still bitch about being made to eat liver & onions or some sort of awful Jell-O salad or whatever without ruining this with political BS.
                  Bask in the warmth of the Deep South
                  No one will be denied:
                  Big law suits and bathroom toots;
                  We're all getting Dixie-fried.
                  But somewhere Hank and Lefty
                  Are rollin' in their graves
                  While kudzu vines grow over signs that read "Jesus Saves."

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Kidneys and baccala. For those that aren't familiar with baccala, it's cod, that is prepared by preserving it with salt. It is then reconstituted by soaking it in water for a couple of days (changing the water frequently). So, yes, it's a labor of love that my grandmother would engage in, much to the delight of my mother, uncle and grandfather. The rest of us...blech. Likewise my mother loved the kidneys that my grandmother prepared. Thankfully, my mother didn't really make either of these dishes, so they were reserved for special occasions with my grandmother making them. Since my grandmother always prepared food on a grand scale, neither of these were really the main dish at a meal we were expected to "enjoy"...as such I mostly got out of eating either of them (which was not generally the case...food that was served was to be eaten...if you didn't/couldn't eat, you went without...no peanut butter and jelly sandwich for the picky). Now, as an adult, I would like to taste both of these, prepared by my grandmother, to see if I might enjoy them now. I recall the baccala usually had a very thin light sauce of tomatoes "mangoes" (really long thin pepper, not the fruit) and maybe some olives. And garlic. Always garlic.

                    The kidneys I don't recall very much. Both of these dishes were such a delicacy to my mom that she was quite happy that we didn't indulge...more for her and my uncle. I don't really recall how my grandfather felt about them. He always loved my grandmother's cooking, but he was Irish, not Italian, so I don't know if he enjoyed these as much as they did.
                    Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
                    Robert Southwell, S.J.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by phillygirl View Post
                      Kidneys and baccala. For those that aren't familiar with baccala, it's cod, that is prepared by preserving it with salt. It is then reconstituted by soaking it in water for a couple of days (changing the water frequently). So, yes, it's a labor of love that my grandmother would engage in, much to the delight of my mother, uncle and grandfather. The rest of us...blech. Likewise my mother loved the kidneys that my grandmother prepared. Thankfully, my mother didn't really make either of these dishes, so they were reserved for special occasions with my grandmother making them. Since my grandmother always prepared food on a grand scale, neither of these were really the main dish at a meal we were expected to "enjoy"...as such I mostly got out of eating either of them (which was not generally the case...food that was served was to be eaten...if you didn't/couldn't eat, you went without...no peanut butter and jelly sandwich for the picky). Now, as an adult, I would like to taste both of these, prepared by my grandmother, to see if I might enjoy them now. I recall the baccala usually had a very thin light sauce of tomatoes "mangoes" (really long thin pepper, not the fruit) and maybe some olives. And garlic. Always garlic.

                      The kidneys I don't recall very much. Both of these dishes were such a delicacy to my mom that she was quite happy that we didn't indulge...more for her and my uncle. I don't really recall how my grandfather felt about them. He always loved my grandmother's cooking, but he was Irish, not Italian, so I don't know if he enjoyed these as much as they did.
                      My mother was amused when I rejected beef liver , "Because it chews back."
                      The year's at the spring
                      And day's at the morn;
                      Morning's at seven;
                      The hill-side's dew-pearled;
                      The lark's on the wing;
                      The snail's on the thorn:
                      God's in his heaven—
                      All's right with the world!

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Michele View Post
                        We grew up on soups and casseroles during the week. Macaroni and cheese was a meal, not a side dish. Saturday was usually hamburgers or even meat sandwiches. A pot roast with vegetables or roasted chicken with stuffing was an early Sunday dinner. Salad and homemade bread was on our table every night along with a bowl of mashed potatoes...no potatoes with spaghetti. Summertime was filled with salmon and other fish, crab and clams. Looking at this menu, it's a wonder I was such a slight thing and no wonder why I crave carbs today. Still, I'm grateful for my mom's home-cooked foods.

                        I still have a majority of these foods now (lacking on the precious fresh seafood but at least once a week) but the casseroles are probably deconstructed...I'll have the protein and vegetables by themselves minus the binder.

                        Most hated food...liver. I loved smelling it cooking because my mom made it with bacon and onions but the texture and taste...🤢

                        Most loved food...any carb with sauce or gravy. I really have to restrict myself because I could eat it for every meal, breakfast included. Which brings me to my question...do you eat leftovers?
                        I abhor waste, so I eat left,left, leftovers.

                        Mark
                        Race Card: A tool of the intellectually weak and lazy when they cannot counter a logical argument or factual data.

                        "Liberals have to stop insisting that the world is what they want it to be instead of the way it is." - Bill Maher

                        Political correctness is ideological fascism. It’s the antithesis of freedom. Dr. Piper

                        Gender is not a "Social Construct", it is an outgrowth of biological reality.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by 80zephyr View Post

                          I abhor waste, so I eat left,left, leftovers.

                          Mark
                          I eat them too especially for breakfast because I have a habit of eating my first meal late morning.

                          It seems like in the last ten years or so, we like to split a lot of meals when we go out. Our favorite Mexican restaurant has a special with Carne Asada, Pollo and Camaron. I take maybe 1/3 of the meat, all of the beans and Pico. My husband has the rest of the meats, all of the rice, guacamole and tortillas. Works out well with no extra charge. At other places we might have to pay a couple dollars upcharge but we don't mind.
                          May we raise children who love the unloved things - the dandelion, the worm, the spiderlings.
                          Children who sense the rose needs the thorn and run into rainswept days the same way they turn towards the sun...
                          And when they're grown and someone has to speak for those who have no voice,
                          may they draw upon that wilder bond, those days of tending tender things and be the one.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by 80zephyr View Post

                            I abhor waste, so I eat left,left, leftovers.

                            Mark
                            We called my grandfather the human garbage can! At the end of the meal, if there was food left on our plates, my grandmother asked him if he wanted it. He always said no, he was too full, and then she would tell him it would have to be thrown out, so he relented and it was passed down to him! As for the food that was in the serving dishes, that of course was out away and reserved. I lived thanksgiving and Christmas bc we ate those leftovers for at least 3 days. But I loved everything about those meals!
                            Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
                            Robert Southwell, S.J.

                            Comment

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