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Homemade low-sodium Worcestershire sauce

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  • Homemade low-sodium Worcestershire sauce

    There are technically three different ways to make the same recipe, though two of them are just different ways of getting to the same place. One is using fresh ingredients and the other is using powder equivalents. I prefer to use fresh ingredients, but it does involve more work and realistically, this would have to be something you already have around or otherwise will use. If you aren’t likely to, say, use up a bulb of garlic in the foreseeable future, then it’s probably easier to just use the powders instead. So, I’ll divide this into using fresh ingredients or using powders. Also, nothing says you can’t mix the two as needed: ginger powder and fresh garlic, for example.

    Either way, yield is about six ounces, roughly ¾ of a cup. With a serving size of 1 tablespoon, sodium is about 82mg per serving, rather than the 195mg/tablespoon for Lea & Perrins (they measure theirs as 65mg/teaspoon).



    Powder method:

    Ingredients:
    • ½ cup apple cider vinegar
    • 2 tablespoons reduced-sodium tamari sauce (the lowest sodium product locally is Kikkoman’s; a company called Ocean’s Halo based in Oregon has a tamari that is a little bit lower in sodium, but it’s only available here by having it shipped, not in local grocery stores)
    • 2 tablespoons water
    • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
    • ¼ teaspoon ginger powder
    • ¼ teaspoon mustard powder
    • ½ teaspoon onion powder
    • ½ teaspoon garlic powder
    • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
    • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
    • 1 heaping tablespoon molasses
    • Small handful of whole cloves, perhaps 8-10


    Directions:
    Combine all ingredients except for cloves and molasses in small-medium saucepan. Bring to a full, rolling boil, stirring constantly. As soon as sauce reaches full boil, reduce heat to simmer for about three minutes. During simmering, add cloves and molasses, stirring with the spoon used for the molasses in order to let the hot liquid “melt” the molasses off the spoon.

    Allow sauce to cool, stirring occasionally.

    Once the sauce has cooled enough to touch the pot with your bare hand (probably thirty minutes or so), strain sauce through a fine-mesh sieve to catch cloves and any other solids. Put in airtight container and this can stay in the refrigerator for quite some time. I repurpose old bottles for this purpose.



    Whole ingredients method:

    Ingredients:

    Same as powder method, except substitute:
    • 1 teaspoon ground or sliced ginger root
    • Roughly two ounces of onion (I prefer Vidalia, but any kind will work)
    • 1 clove garlic, chopped or sliced into thin slices, or pressed through a garlic press


    Directions for method one (the method I prefer):
    Same directions as powder method, except put your fresh ingredients into a food processor and mince well (you can leave the garlic and ginger whole in this case; just peel the skin off). Once that is done, add a few ounces of the liquid and purée thoroughly. Add a few more ounces of the liquid to “wash” the purée out of the food processor. Then, once the sauce has cooled enough, use not a fine-mesh sieve, but instead a sieve with much larger holes, or even a colander. This will stop the cloves, but will allow the rest of the remaining purée that hasn’t dissolved pass through.

    I prefer this method because I like having those solids in the sauce over time, as the sauce will continue to “mellow” for a couple of days and have less of the “bite” of vinegar over time. But, it will mellow to some extent no matter which method is used, mostly as it cools, so don’t be surprised at a sharp taste while it’s still hot from the stove.


    Directions for method two:
    Same as above, but no need to bother with the food processor or making a purée. Just chop up ingredients well, then use a fine-mesh sieve to strain all solids out of the sauce. Simmer for five to seven minutes rather than three in this case.



    Notes:
    1. I like the method that leaves some solids in the sauce because to me it has a bit richer of a taste than even store-brand Worcestershire. That's just a personal preference. If you don't like that, if you don't want pulp in your orange juice and want your Worcestershire to be purely liquid, then I wouldn't recommend going this route.
    2. Theoretically, one could substitute more dark brown sugar for molasses, but I have not really had any success in getting it to taste quite the same and the sharpness of the cider vinegar is not dulled as much as with molasses.
    3. If possible, it is easier to make this in a non-stick pan. You're going to have a good bit of sugar bubble up, and it will clean more easily from non-stick.
    Last edited by Adam; Thursday, May 6, 2021, 9:21 PM.
    It's been ten years since that lonely day I left you
    In the morning rain, smoking gun in hand
    Ten lonely years but how my heart, it still remembers
    Pray for me, momma, I'm a gypsy now

  • #2
    I think I would like the fresh method primarily because fresh ginger tastes so different than powdered ginger. I love to add fresh ginger to my stir fry's.
    Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
    Robert Southwell, S.J.

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    • #3
      Sounds good. No fermented anchovies, though.

      Of course, the neighbors would probably object to anchovies fermenting.
      “I do not aim with my hand; he who aims with his hand has forgotten the face of his father.
      I aim with my eye.

      "I do not shoot with my hand; he who shoots with his hand has forgotten the face of his father.
      I shoot with my mind.

      "I do not kill with my gun; he who kills with his gun has forgotten the face of his father.
      I kill with my heart.”

      The Gunslinger Creed, Stephen King, The Dark Tower

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      • #4
        Originally posted by daveman View Post
        Sounds good. No fermented anchovies, though.

        Of course, the neighbors would probably object to anchovies fermenting.
        The lack of those is what saves a bunch of the salt. Of course, anchovies being fish is just a cruel myth; they're actually just very dense deposits of sea salt that someone called a fish once and it stuck.
        It's been ten years since that lonely day I left you
        In the morning rain, smoking gun in hand
        Ten lonely years but how my heart, it still remembers
        Pray for me, momma, I'm a gypsy now

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Adam View Post
          The lack of those is what saves a bunch of the salt. Of course, anchovies being fish is just a cruel myth; they're actually just very dense stinky deposits of sea salt that someone called a fish once and it stuck.
          Fixed.
          "Since the historic ruling, the Lovings have become icons for equality. Mildred released a statement on the 40th anniversary of the ruling in 2007: 'I am proud that Richard’s and my name is on a court case that can help reinforce the love, the commitment, the fairness, and the family that so many people, Black or white, young or old, gay or straight, seek in life. I support the freedom to marry for all. That’s what Loving, and loving, are all about.'." - Mildred Loving (Loving v. Virginia)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Adam View Post
            The lack of those is what saves a bunch of the salt. Of course, anchovies being fish is just a cruel myth; they're actually just very dense deposits of sea salt that someone called a fish once and it stuck.
            “I do not aim with my hand; he who aims with his hand has forgotten the face of his father.
            I aim with my eye.

            "I do not shoot with my hand; he who shoots with his hand has forgotten the face of his father.
            I shoot with my mind.

            "I do not kill with my gun; he who kills with his gun has forgotten the face of his father.
            I kill with my heart.”

            The Gunslinger Creed, Stephen King, The Dark Tower

            Comment

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