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Exercise just as good as drugs in war on major disease

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  • Exercise just as good as drugs in war on major disease

    Exercise just as good as drugs in war on major disease
    By Laura Donnelly, Health Correspondent1:00PM GMT 13 Dec 2013 Comments115 Comments

    Exercise could be as effective as some of the best drugs which protect against major diseases, research has found.

    A study of more than 300 trials has found that physical activity was better than medication in helping patients recovering from strokes - and just as good as drugs in protecting against diabetes and in stopping heart disease worsening.

    The research, published in the British Medical Journal, analysed data about studies on 340,000 patients diagnosed with one of four diseases: heart disease, chronic heart failure, stroke or diabetes.
    Researchers said the findings suggested that regular exercise could be "quite potent" in improving survival chances, but said that until more studies are done, patients should not stop taking their tablets without taking medical advice.

    The landmark research compared the mortality rates of those prescribed medication for common serious health conditions, with those who were instead enrolled on exercise programmes.

    Most of the 305 studies examined involved patients had been given drugs to treat their condition. But 57 of the trials - involving 15,000 volunteers - examined the impact of exercise as a treatment.

    The research found that while medication worked best for those who had suffered heart failure, in all the other groups of patients, exercise was at least as effective as the drugs which are normally prescribed.

    People with heart disease who exercised but did not use commonly prescribed medications, including statins, and drugs given to reduce blood clots had the same risk of dying as patients taking the medication.

    Similarly, people with borderline diabetes who exercised had the same survival chances as those taking the most commonly prescribed drugs.

    Drugs compared with exercise included statins, which are given to around five million patients suffering from heart disease, or an increased risk of the condition.

    The study was carried out by researcher Huseyin Naci of LSE Health, London School of Economics and Political Science and Harvard Medical School, with US colleagues at Stanford University School of Medicine.
    Interesting.

    Telegraph
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

  • #2
    It wouldn't matter if God, Christ, Obama, JFK (returned form the grave and verified real), and freakin Oprah told people exercise would make them healthy. Unless exercise comes in a pill or a dive up window it ain't happening in any great percentage in the USA.
    If it pays, it stays

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Frostbit View Post
      It wouldn't matter if God, Christ, Obama, JFK (returned form the grave and verified real), and freakin Oprah told people exercise would make them healthy. Unless exercise comes in a pill or a dive up window it ain't happening in any great percentage in the USA.
      Oh, you know how progressive we Americans are. I expect Obamacare (when fully deployed) will have punitive measures for porkers and all of us (fat or not) will somehow have to demonstrate our physical activity level or face fines and sanctions.

      If they can force you to buy a particular item, they can certainly force you to "use" that item according to government regulations.

      Now, the poor, unions, some minorities (not Asians), and other special interest groups will be exempt but not me and you, Frosty.
      "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Gingersnap View Post
        Oh, you know how progressive we Americans are. I expect Obamacare (when fully deployed) will have punitive measures for porkers and all of us (fat or not) will somehow have to demonstrate our physical activity level or face fines and sanctions.

        If they can force you to buy a particular item, they can certainly force you to "use" that item according to government regulations.

        Now, the poor, unions, some minorities (not Asians), and other special interest groups will be exempt but not me and you, Frosty.
        I suspect I could pass any physical test they would care to give but being healthy, eating clean, and working out should be a personal choice. It's a smart choice obviously.
        If it pays, it stays

        Comment


        • #5
          I just checked the Marine Corps fitness requirements. I'm 60 and I could likely pass the 40-45 age testing. Maybe even lower. The run might get me though. The pull ups and crunches wouldn't.

          Corps testing
          If it pays, it stays

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Frostbit View Post
            I suspect I could pass any physical test they would care to give but being healthy, eating clean, and working out should be a personal choice. It's a smart choice obviously.
            Well, who knows? It's unlikely whatever tests or standards are mandated will be sensible so if you can't demonstrate that you walk 45 minutes a day as a dedicated physical exercise, it won't count. What if your total cholesterol is elevated from clean eating but it's due to your hdl and they won't do a vldl test on you?

            The list is endless because there is no lack of absurd 'first principles' burning down common sense in medical policy making. Eat more 'wholesome' whole grain if you're diabetic? Spend hours on cardio if you are fat? Do more Zumba but not more yardwork or housework?
            "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

            Comment

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