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13 pictures of crazy goats on cliffs

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  • 13 pictures of crazy goats on cliffs








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    May we raise children who love the unloved things - the dandelion, the worm, the spiderlings.
    Children who sense the rose needs the thorn and run into rainswept days the same way they turn towards the sun...
    And when they're grown and someone has to speak for those who have no voice,
    may they draw upon that wilder bond, those days of tending tender things and be the one.

  • #2
    I want that bottom Billy!! Gotta be over ten inches. Kodiak is full of those suckers but many are just impossible to get to.
    If it pays, it stays

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Frostbit View Post
      I want that bottom Billy!! Gotta be over ten inches. Kodiak is full of those suckers but many are just impossible to get to.
      My grandson raised a goat through 4-H for fair..he loved that goat and it was the orneriest thing!

      Do you eat goat?
      May we raise children who love the unloved things - the dandelion, the worm, the spiderlings.
      Children who sense the rose needs the thorn and run into rainswept days the same way they turn towards the sun...
      And when they're grown and someone has to speak for those who have no voice,
      may they draw upon that wilder bond, those days of tending tender things and be the one.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Michele View Post
        My grandson raised a goat through 4-H for fair..he loved that goat and it was the orneriest thing!

        Do you eat goat?
        I've never hunted them. Friends that have are split 50/50 about their taste. Seems they either loved them or barely tolorated them. I've eaten domestic goat in the form of soup and found it chewy but edible.

        Brett and I are seriously considering a Kodiak Goat hunt in the next two years. There's a couple areas on the South side of the island that you can fly into small alpine lakes above tree level and skip the 1,500 feet of "jail bars" (alder) you have to fight through to get above tree line. The risk is weather changes can strand you and you have to then make it to salt water on your own for an alternative pick up point. That's when a hunt turns into a survival challenge. I think I'm physically up for it. My fear of heights might be a problem in a cliff face scenario though. It would just limit the choices a bit. Needless to say the beauty in the thread starter would be off limits. What a stud he is though!! They are also WAY WAY bigger than they look and the pack out if you had to decend to Salt water would be really tough.
        If it pays, it stays

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        • #5
          Goats are just flat-out weird critters, AFAIC. As if their somewhat-freaky eyes weren't enough, their behavior is just plain strange (see: pictures from OP).

          When I was about 17, I did some yard work for a friend/co-worker of my father. They had about 20 acres of land, about five of which was on a very steep (about 60° type of vertical) hill, and I was engaged to weed-eat this hill, sort of a seasonal bush-hogging, as a "gift" to her husband (i.e. the weed-eating was done, so he didn't have to do it). It was hot, nasty work, but I was getting paid $150 for an afternoon's worth of work, and in 1990, as a piss-poor high school student, this was some fairly serious cash, so I was happy to oblige.

          Anne's kids (no pun intended) had somehow rescued a ... kid, a couple of years earlier. How they came about a goat in middle Tennessee is beyond me, but they did, nonetheless, and they were insistent that the family keep the kid as a pet. So, they fenced off about an acre (most of it relatively flat) of this hill for the goat to live.

          During a blistering-hot July afternoon, I went to weed-eat this hill. An hour or two into this work, I got seriously head-butted in the ass from this goat. Knocked me right down the hill, ass over teakettle. Well, I didn't know WTH to do with this goat who had jumped the fence, but the blasted thing just followed me around. So I picked myself up and, after a few minutes of trying without success to coax the goat back into the pen, I eventually just went back to weed-eating, occasionally taking breaks to pat the damned goat on the head.

          I covered that whole hill, including the acre or so that was his pen, weed-eating everything to the ground. I thought that goats would eat anything, especially undergrowth around them, but this damned goat didn't eat a single bite the whole time I was working. When I was finished, in his pen, I just went out through the gate, and he stayed put. And then he went about grazing on the grass that I had just weed-eated.

          All I could think was "you sumbitch! you could have eaten some of that shit I was so busy cutting down!"



          Oh well. I got the job done and got paid my negotiated price, but for the sore ass from where he head-butted me.




          I still say goats are weird critters. But they are tasty. We went to goat-roasts every year throughout my childhood with someone else who worked with my father. All day over a spit makes for some pretty tasty barbecued goat sandwiches.
          Bask in the warmth of the Deep South
          No one will be denied:
          Big law suits and bathroom toots;
          We're all getting Dixie-fried.
          But somewhere Hank and Lefty
          Are rollin' in their graves
          While kudzu vines grow over signs that read "Jesus Saves."

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          • #6
            I like the one with the baby goats.

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