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And yet these fools keep claiming that it's the South that's racist

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  • And yet these fools keep claiming that it's the South that's racist




    New York state has the most segregated public schools in the nation, and New York City is one of the most segregated school districts in the country, UCLA researchers said in a report Wednesday.

    Nearly 30 percent of the state’s public schools had minority enrollments of 90 percent or more, even though 51 percent of the state’s students were white in the 2010-2011 school year covered by the report.

    “In the 30 years I have been researching schools, New York state has consistently been one of the most segregated states in the nation — no Southern state comes close to New York,” said UCLA Civil Rights Project co-director Gary Orfield.

    “Decades of reforms ignoring this issue produced strategies that have not succeeded in making segregated schools equal,” he said.

    Illinois, Michigan, Maryland and New Jersey followed New York on the most-segregated school list.
    Personally, I'm annoyed that they're calling this "segregation." To segregate is an active, outside influence. I rather doubt that there's any specific effort by some official in New York to keep Black students separate from everyone else. Instead, there are cases of "cultural clinging" in a lot of cases, which is often some of the basis of resentment over "gentrification:" "we like our ghetto just the way it is, thank you very much." I'm sure economics plays a large part: there simply are more wealthy white people on Park Avenue in the 70s than there are wealthy Black people, and there are more poor Black people than poor white people in Red Hook.

    Regardless, it brings a smirk of satisfaction to my face to see this quantification that completely destroys the Leftist elites' typical bigoted Leftist stereotype upon which Leftists base all of their "thought."
    It's been ten years since that lonely day I left you
    In the morning rain, smoking gun in hand
    Ten lonely years but how my heart, it still remembers
    Pray for me, momma, I'm a gypsy now

  • #2
    I moved from SW Mo to the Stl area in '78.
    My daughter was 4 at the time.

    My wive was converted RCC, I'm pretty much agnostic, or sort of burned out First Christian.... another chapter in the chronicles of Gramps left undone..

    We had hit the area just when mandated busing was headed into effect.

    I'm looking at my 4 year old, blond, blue eyed daughter and saying... there is no fucking way I can put her on a bus for a 45 min trip to some inner city school.

    So, I agreed to my daughter attending the local parish parochial school.
    We had moved to a subdivision that was 5 minutes away from a Stl S County HS.
    When they implemented busing.... that school went up about 20 notches in the 'power' ladder because of the influx of athletes from the inner city.

    That was the late 70's.
    It has reverted back now.
    The schools are not segregated, (look up the definition) but grouped by ethnicity by association and preference.

    There is a ring in the greater Stl area.
    Inner city... Outer city... the Stl County districts adjacent to the city proper and the outer districts in Stl County.

    As you progress from the inner city to the outer borders of Stl County, you see a gradation.
    Robert Francis O'Rourke, Democrat, White guy, spent ~78 million to defeat, Ted Cruz, Republican immigrant Dark guy …
    and lost …
    But the Republicans are racist.

    Comment


    • #3
      There is some pretty loose language around this phenomena, all right. Schools, by and large, reflect the adjacent community which was why busing failed so much. You take a bunch of kids from neighborhood A and shove them into neighborhood B and then expect a magical transference of culture, skill, behavior, and buddyhood.

      In reality, the bused kids just stuck together in a tight pack and they didn't have enough numbers to affect the school culture for good or bad.

      If the "segregation" they are concerned about involves inner city blacks or illegal Hispanics, then the solution is work-related. Get rid of the illegal aliens, change the welfare structure to reward work, and put in the buses, bike lanes, and whatever to get the working class people to their worky jobs. Do that and people will live wherever it's convenient instead of living where their welfare status is an issue or where they are surrounded by whatever non-English infrastructure is appealing.

      Differently skin-toned people who share a common culture of work, non-criminal behavior, and weekend Honey-do lists don't seem to have a lot of racial animosity. Probably because they are trying to figure out how to pay for Little league while fantasizing about that bedroom repainting project. It's not as edgy as knifing your Baby Daddy or stealing bikes but it is pretty engrossing.
      "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

      Comment


      • #4
        The objective of some in politics and education hasn't changed since the 1970's.

        They want to take local control away from municipalities, counties, and states.
        They want to eliminate local funding of schools and control the use of all education funds.
        They want to bus students across economic and political boundaries to achieve "balance".
        The year's at the spring
        And day's at the morn;
        Morning's at seven;
        The hill-side's dew-pearled;
        The lark's on the wing;
        The snail's on the thorn:
        God's in his heaven—
        All's right with the world!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Novaheart View Post
          The objective of some in politics and education hasn't changed since the 1970's.

          They want to take local control away from municipalities, counties, and states.
          They want to eliminate local funding of schools and control the use of all education funds.
          They want to bus students across economic and political boundaries to achieve "balance".
          I wish you and a few million of your peers understood and voted with that understanding in the 1970s. We'd be much better off.
          "Faith is nothing but a firm assent of the mind : which, if it be regulated, as is our duty, cannot be afforded to anything but upon good reason, and so cannot be opposite to it."
          -John Locke

          "It's all been melded together into one giant, authoritarian, leftist scream."
          -Newman

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by scott View Post
            I wish you and a few million of your peers understood and voted with that understanding in the 1970s. We'd be much better off.
            Nova couldn't vote in the 1970s. Even I couldn't vote until 1974. The important votes were cast (or not - most of the desgregation effort was not driven by the popular vote) in the mid to late 1960's.

            Everyone shares the blame for the appalling outcome of forced busing. Perspective is important. There has ALWAYS been forced busing, since the first Negro school was built by a local government. It's just a question of whose kids are getting bused. Or in some cases, who had to walk past the white school to get across town to the only black school.

            Massive resistance to any form of desegregation led to ever harsher measures to enforce it. There's no doubt that it's a god-awful mess now. There's no question that kids who are bused out of their communities care less about their schools and tend to cause discipline problems. The question now is how we fix that.

            In Florida, there are many areas that are racially integrated (not just desegregated) now. The real problem at this point is that there's a whole capital investment and bureaucracy dependent on continued busing. So instead of just going to neighborhood schools, they've invented this "magnet school" thing. Kids are riding buses for up to 90 minutes each way to go to the science magnet or the International Baccalaureate magnet or the music and arts magnet. But those schools also have a mandate to serve the communities in which they are situated. So you have a Gibbs High, situated in a low-income and lower-middle-income area, heavily but not nearly exclusively black, and you bus in a bunch of art/theater/music/dance majors (because high schools now have "majors," yes). Do the black kids hate the white kids, and the white kids hate the black kids, and everybody hates the Jews (apologies to Tom Lehrer)? Nope. The "trads" (traditional curriculum) hate the magnet kids and beat the shit out of them every chance they get. Highest felony arrest stats of any school in Florida, unless something has changed recently.
            "Since the historic ruling, the Lovings have become icons for equality. Mildred released a statement on the 40th anniversary of the ruling in 2007: 'I am proud that Richard’s and my name is on a court case that can help reinforce the love, the commitment, the fairness, and the family that so many people, Black or white, young or old, gay or straight, seek in life. I support the freedom to marry for all. That’s what Loving, and loving, are all about.'." - Mildred Loving (Loving v. Virginia)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Celeste Chalfonte View Post
              Nova couldn't vote in the 1970s. Even I couldn't vote until 1974. The important votes were cast (or not - most of the desgregation effort was not driven by the popular vote) in the mid to late 1960's.

              Everyone shares the blame for the appalling outcome of forced busing. Perspective is important. There has ALWAYS been forced busing, since the first Negro school was built by a local government. It's just a question of whose kids are getting bused. Or in some cases, who had to walk past the white school to get across town to the only black school.

              Massive resistance to any form of desegregation led to ever harsher measures to enforce it. There's no doubt that it's a god-awful mess now. There's no question that kids who are bused out of their communities care less about their schools and tend to cause discipline problems. The question now is how we fix that.

              In Florida, there are many areas that are racially integrated (not just desegregated) now. The real problem at this point is that there's a whole capital investment and bureaucracy dependent on continued busing. So instead of just going to neighborhood schools, they've invented this "magnet school" thing. Kids are riding buses for up to 90 minutes each way to go to the science magnet or the International Baccalaureate magnet or the music and arts magnet. But those schools also have a mandate to serve the communities in which they are situated. So you have a Gibbs High, situated in a low-income and lower-middle-income area, heavily but not nearly exclusively black, and you bus in a bunch of art/theater/music/dance majors (because high schools now have "majors," yes). Do the black kids hate the white kids, and the white kids hate the black kids, and everybody hates the Jews (apologies to Tom Lehrer)? Nope. The "trads" (traditional curriculum) hate the magnet kids and beat the shit out of them every chance they get. Highest felony arrest stats of any school in Florida, unless something has changed recently.
              That's an excellent summary of the problem and why I've opted my kids out of it.
              "Faith is nothing but a firm assent of the mind : which, if it be regulated, as is our duty, cannot be afforded to anything but upon good reason, and so cannot be opposite to it."
              -John Locke

              "It's all been melded together into one giant, authoritarian, leftist scream."
              -Newman

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Adam View Post
                Personally, I'm annoyed that they're calling this "segregation." To segregate is an active, outside influence. I rather doubt that there's any specific effort by some official in New York to keep Black students separate from everyone else. Instead, there are cases of "cultural clinging" in a lot of cases, which is often some of the basis of resentment over "gentrification:" "we like our ghetto just the way it is, thank you very much." I'm sure economics plays a large part: there simply are more wealthy white people on Park Avenue in the 70s than there are wealthy Black people, and there are more poor Black people than poor white people in Red Hook.

                Regardless, it brings a smirk of satisfaction to my face to see this quantification that completely destroys the Leftist elites' typical bigoted Leftist stereotype upon which Leftists base all of their "thought."
                I think they make a bigger deal out of NYC. I live down here and I know for a fact that some areas are really segregated (or gerry mandered. Call it what you want). When I was in school, I used to count on my fingers how many non-whites there were (less than ten in high school). It was a running joke because one side would be the county schools. The other side would be the city schools (and it just so happened to be divided by black and white neighborhoods. I don't believe that was an accident). They're better about things now. They're not quite as divisive. In fact, they go to the opposite extreme. We also have more Hispanics around, which have helped even the playing field some. However, my area still has mostly white schools and mostly blacks schools.

                On a personal note, when I first graduated high school, I was telling myself "This person is black" in my head all the time. I told my mother. She was like "That's not normal." I couldn't help it. I wasn't used to it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Lanie View Post
                  I think they make a bigger deal out of NYC. I live down here and I know for a fact that some areas are really segregated (or gerry mandered. Call it what you want). When I was in school, I used to count on my fingers how many non-whites there were (less than ten in high school). It was a running joke because one side would be the county schools. The other side would be the city schools (and it just so happened to be divided by black and white neighborhoods. I don't believe that was an accident). They're better about things now. They're not quite as divisive. In fact, they go to the opposite extreme. We also have more Hispanics around, which have helped even the playing field some. However, my area still has mostly white schools and mostly blacks schools.

                  On a personal note, when I first graduated high school, I was telling myself "This person is black" in my head all the time. I told my mother. She was like "That's not normal." I couldn't help it. I wasn't used to it.
                  What do you mean by that?
                  Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
                  Robert Southwell, S.J.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Lanie View Post
                    I think they make a bigger deal out of NYC. I live down here and I know for a fact that some areas are really segregated (or gerry mandered. Call it what you want). When I was in school, I used to count on my fingers how many non-whites there were (less than ten in high school). It was a running joke because one side would be the county schools. The other side would be the city schools (and it just so happened to be divided by black and white neighborhoods. I don't believe that was an accident). They're better about things now. They're not quite as divisive. In fact, they go to the opposite extreme. We also have more Hispanics around, which have helped even the playing field some. However, my area still has mostly white schools and mostly blacks schools.

                    On a personal note, when I first graduated high school, I was telling myself "This person is black" in my head all the time. I told my mother. She was like "That's not normal." I couldn't help it. I wasn't used to it.
                    So, lets examine that statement.

                    People are FORCED to live in certain neighborhoods based on ethnicity?

                    That is what you just said, even if you didn't mean it that way.

                    Define 'segregated' in your own words without some dictionary help.
                    Robert Francis O'Rourke, Democrat, White guy, spent ~78 million to defeat, Ted Cruz, Republican immigrant Dark guy …
                    and lost …
                    But the Republicans are racist.

                    Comment

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