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Life lesson: don't tweet direct threats to an airline.

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  • Life lesson: don't tweet direct threats to an airline.

    And the dumbass of the day award goes to: some idiot Dutch teenager:




    After this exploded all over the twitterverse all day yesterday, she spent the day having a good, ol' fashioned meltdown on twitter, saying, among other things, that she didn't want her mother to find out what she had done because her mother might make her close her twitter account (!).

    And then came this:



    And now her twitter account is suspended.


    I'm guessing her mother has found out what she did by now.



    Now, I don't think that she needs to be strung up outside The Hague or anything like that, but she does need to get the shit scared out of her and she needs to be made an example to teenagers around to world to not go full retard on the internet, whether that's making idiotic empty threats or tweeting topless pictures of yourself to your boyfriend.
    It's been ten years since that lonely day I left you
    In the morning rain, smoking gun in hand
    Ten lonely years but how my heart, it still remembers
    Pray for me, momma, I'm a gypsy now

  • #2
    Yeah, kind of a big deal. She needs to attend some kind of formal hearing and have some kind of real life consequences in terms of community service, etc. If it were me, I know that my parents' wrath would be more than sufficient and I hope her parents are the same.
    Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
    Robert Southwell, S.J.

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    • #3
      Lily-white workers wanted, says Dutch cleaning company


      The company's 'whites only' Facebook ad made headlines this week in the Netherlands, which has seen a rise in overt racism and xenophobia in recent years.

      By Sara Miller Llana, Staff writer / April 11, 2014
      http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Europ...eaning-company

      Children learn what they see adults doing. Doesn't excuse stupidity, and I don't disagree about there being some consequences. But don't count on the wrath of parents being among them. At least not wrath toward the kid.
      "Since the historic ruling, the Lovings have become icons for equality. Mildred released a statement on the 40th anniversary of the ruling in 2007: 'I am proud that Richard’s and my name is on a court case that can help reinforce the love, the commitment, the fairness, and the family that so many people, Black or white, young or old, gay or straight, seek in life. I support the freedom to marry for all. That’s what Loving, and loving, are all about.'." - Mildred Loving (Loving v. Virginia)

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Celeste Chalfonte View Post
        http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Europ...eaning-company

        Children learn what they see adults doing. Doesn't excuse stupidity, and I don't disagree about there being some consequences. But don't count on the wrath of parents being among them. At least not wrath toward the kid.
        That's too bad. I learned my first lesson in racism when I was about 10 years old and someone spray painted "everyone should own a n***** at my bus stop. We had one black family in the neighborhood and I suppose it was directed to them. The kids in that family usually came to our house every morning to wait for the bus, as my mom was home and their mom worked. I remember being shocked at it and not understanding why such a thing would be put there. Apparently the parents in the neighborhood had their suspicions about its origin because I got an earful about "farm hands" and have to admit that I wasn't really piecing that together either.

        One thing my family never did in terms of us as kids was to show any hint of racism, discrimination, etc. As an adult I later learned of their various prejudices (as we all have them), but they were never voiced to us. I heard the n word exactly twice by a family member when I was a kid. The first time was from my grandmother (dad's side) after she had been involved in a car accident. My mother was very clear about her disapproval of that language or that word in our presence (I had never heard her speak that way to my grandmother before) and it was never said again. The second time was again on my dad's side and a second cousin of sorts kept using it when discussing a fight her son (Hanky...really big, stupid kid) had had at school. We were at someone's house after a funeral and she must have said the word at least 4 times. My mother (who didn't like my father's family anyway) calmly said to her "Patsy, are you upset because your son got the shit beat out of him in a fight, or because it was a n***** that was able to do it?" My father immediately got up, pulled my mom out of the room and told us to get in the car as "Patsy" was purple with rage. I don't remember ever seeing that side of the family again, and my mother again railed in the car about how that family was nothing but trash.

        We were always told the story of my grandfather (mom's side) being taught to play the drums by a black man (my grandfather was a singer and had his own radio show at one time). We always knew that making better for ourselves never meant doing so by looking down on others because of differences in skin color, race, religion, etc. I can not possibly imagine the repercussions if we were to ever had said something racist in front of my parents.
        Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
        Robert Southwell, S.J.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Celeste Chalfonte View Post
          http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Europ...eaning-company

          Children learn what they see adults doing. Doesn't excuse stupidity, and I don't disagree about there being some consequences. But don't count on the wrath of parents being among them. At least not wrath toward the kid.
          Kids do learn a lot from their parents, but there's also a mental block keeping them from taking things seriously. I think it's physical, part of brain development.

          I don't think her life should be ruined, just have the crap scared out of her.

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          • #6
            If there ever was a time the Ebonics phrase, 'you gon' learn today... ' would apply... This would be it.

            ~Dallas

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Dallas View Post
              If there ever was a time the Ebonics phrase, 'you gon' learn today... ' would apply... This would be it.

              ~Dallas


              And I don't think of that as Ebonics...I think of it as southern.
              Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
              Robert Southwell, S.J.

              Comment

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