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  • Habits of rich & poor

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    "1. 70% of wealthy eat less than 300 junk food calories per day. 97% of poor people eat more than 300 junk food calories per day. 23% of wealthy gamble. 52% of poor people gamble.

    2. 80% of wealthy are focused on accomplishing some single goal. Only 12% of the poor do this.

    3. 76% of wealthy exercise aerobically four days a week. 23% of poor do this.

    4. 63% of wealthy listen to audio books during commute to work vs. 5% of poor people.

    5. 81% of wealthy maintain a to-do list vs. 19% of poor.

    6. 63% of wealthy parents make their children read two or more non-fiction books a month vs. 3% of poor.

    7. 70% of wealthy parents make their children volunteer 10 hours or more a month vs. 3% of poor.

    8. 80% of wealthy make Happy Birthday calls vs. 11% of poor.

    9. 67% of wealthy write down their goals vs. 17% of poor.

    10. 88% of wealthy read 30 minutes or more each day for education or career reasons vs. 2% of poor.

    11. 6% of wealthy say what’s on their mind vs. 69% of poor.

    12. 79% of wealthy network five hours or more each month vs. 16% of poor.

    13. 67% of wealthy watch one hour or less of TV every day vs. 23% of poor.

    14. 6% of wealthy watch reality TV vs. 78% of poor.

    15. 44% of wealthy wake up three hours before work starts vs. 3% of poor.

    16. 74% of wealthy teach good daily success habits to their children vs. 1% of poor.

    17. 84% of wealthy believe good habits create opportunity luck vs. 4% of poor.

    18. 76% of wealthy believe bad habits create detrimental luck vs. 9% of poor.

    19. 86% of wealthy believe in lifelong educational self-improvement vs. 5% of poor.

    20. 86% of wealthy love to read vs. 26% of poor."
    If it pays, it stays

  • #2
    Some of these are rather interesting and I wouldn't have thought of them before.




    63% of wealthy listen to audio books during commute to work vs. 5% of poor people.

    That's interesting. I wonder how the comparison is for those who read rather than listen to audio books. There's a whole lot of rich people in Connecticut who have a couple of hours on the train each day, and I suspect that most of them are reading newspapers, but it would be interesting to see how many are reading books instead.
    80% of wealthy make Happy Birthday calls vs. 11% of poor.

    That's very interesting. I am the world's worst about birthdays. I pretty much never remember them, and I have a fairly bad habit of not being cognizant of the date when I do remember them. For example, some years ago I forgot my (then) wife's birthday. It's not that I didn't know that it happened on June 1, nor was it that I didn't realize it was coming up; I just completely forgot on that day that the date that day was June 1. I completely had it in my head that it was still May.
    44% of wealthy wake up three hours before work starts vs. 3% of poor.

    Hmph. It's about two hours for me. Frankly, I'm not really sure what I would do with an additional hour before work, as I generally get everything I need done in order to start the day done in those two hours: check the local and international news, try to get a jump-start on e-mails, etc. I'm guessing a lot of these people are working out in the mornings, which I would never do. When I was capable of such, I always worked out in the afternoons; it's always been a stress-breaker for me after work.
    It's been ten years since that lonely day I left you
    In the morning rain, smoking gun in hand
    Ten lonely years but how my heart, it still remembers
    Pray for me, momma, I'm a gypsy now

    Comment


    • #3
      This is nice and good, but I really don't believe they are true statistics.

      For example, I seriously doubt 63% of "the wealthy" make their children read 2 non-fiction books per month.

      These are great "beatitudes" for habits of the wealthy, but I think they are also a lot of self-congratulatory platitudes.
      Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
      Robert Southwell, S.J.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm not sure if I believe all of that. The junk food I believe (as I was reading this, I was finishing my Sun Chips. lol).

        Goals. I think poor people have goals, but don't necessarily do a good job of trying to keep them.

        Non-fiction books. So what? If your kids are reading fiction books, they're still bringing their reading skills up.

        Birthday calls I don't believe for a minute (although I will point out some poor people don't have a phone).

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Lanie View Post
          I will point out some poor people don't have a phone.
          You're joking right? Every homeless person in Anchorage, and there are many, have a cell phone. They are on them while begging at the street corners.
          If it pays, it stays

          Comment


          • #6
            Like Neal Boortz used to say (paraphrased):

            The rich keep getting richer because of what they do with their time and money, ditto for the poor.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Frostbit View Post
              You're joking right? Every homeless person in Anchorage, and there are many, have a cell phone. They are on them while begging at the street corners.
              When I was growing up, long distance calls were a luxury that most of my family did not indulge in. Those phone calls were specifically to inform of a death, a birth, or wish a happy birthday. They were very short in duration, and while we might get on the line to say hello to the grandparents, we better be quick about it, as it was expensive.

              My great uncle lived in NYC and would come by train to visit us. He might come into Philly train station or Wilmington. He would make a person to person collect call and ask for Mr. Wilmington. We were to say he wasn't there, at which point he would tell the operator that he would call back at 3:28 on Thursday. I'm pretty certain the operator knew the scam.

              The best was the time he left his glasses at our house, and did the same thing, asking for "Mr. Glass". There was no good answer as responding yes would incur a charge; responding no, to avoid the charge, didn't pass on the information that they were in fact there.

              Yeah...my family pinched their pennies!
              Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
              Robert Southwell, S.J.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by phillygirl View Post
                When I was growing up, long distance calls were a luxury that most of my family did not indulge in. Those phone calls were specifically to inform of a death, a birth, or wish a happy birthday. They were very short in duration, and while we might get on the line to say hello to the grandparents, we better be quick about it, as it was expensive.

                My great uncle lived in NYC and would come by train to visit us. He might come into Philly train station or Wilmington. He would make a person to person collect call and ask for Mr. Wilmington. We were to say he wasn't there, at which point he would tell the operator that he would call back at 3:28 on Thursday. I'm pretty certain the operator knew the scam.

                The best was the time he left his glasses at our house, and did the same thing, asking for "Mr. Glass". There was no good answer as responding yes would incur a charge; responding no, to avoid the charge, didn't pass on the information that they were in fact there.

                Yeah...my family pinched their pennies!

                Surprised they all aren't on unemployment working under the table while sliding the EBT cards for their crab cakes.
                If it pays, it stays

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Frostbit View Post
                  Surprised they all aren't on unemployment working under the table while sliding the EBT cards for their crab cakes.
                  They're not because they pinched their pennies!

                  But yes, I *enjoyed* the free government cheese my grandmother got when I was in college. I have no idea how she got it, as I don't think they income qualified...but she got it! That stuff just did not melt...I swear they use it to plug leaks in the space shuttle!
                  Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
                  Robert Southwell, S.J.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Frostbit View Post
                    You're joking right? Every homeless person in Anchorage, and there are many, have a cell phone. They are on them while begging at the street corners.
                    I have not seen a homeless person yet with a cell phone.

                    on edit: http://www.accuconference.com/blog/C...tatistics.aspx

                    87% of American adults own a cell phone, and 45% of those are smart phones.
                    Only 12% of adults age 65 and over have a smartphone.
                    82% take pictures on their cell phones, up from 76% in 2010.
                    29% check their bank account online, up from 18% in 2011.
                    9% of adults have texted a charitable organization to make a donation
                    So, not all adults have a cell. lol.
                    Last edited by Lanie; Monday, January 6, 2014, 10:46 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by phillygirl View Post
                      When I was growing up, long distance calls were a luxury that most of my family did not indulge in. Those phone calls were specifically to inform of a death, a birth, or wish a happy birthday. They were very short in duration, and while we might get on the line to say hello to the grandparents, we better be quick about it, as it was expensive.

                      My great uncle lived in NYC and would come by train to visit us. He might come into Philly train station or Wilmington. He would make a person to person collect call and ask for Mr. Wilmington. We were to say he wasn't there, at which point he would tell the operator that he would call back at 3:28 on Thursday. I'm pretty certain the operator knew the scam.

                      The best was the time he left his glasses at our house, and did the same thing, asking for "Mr. Glass". There was no good answer as responding yes would incur a charge; responding no, to avoid the charge, didn't pass on the information that they were in fact there.

                      Yeah...my family pinched their pennies!

                      That reminds me of this. lol.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by phillygirl View Post
                        This is nice and good, but I really don't believe they are true statistics.

                        For example, I seriously doubt 63% of "the wealthy" make their children read 2 non-fiction books per month.

                        These are great "beatitudes" for habits of the wealthy, but I think they are also a lot of self-congratulatory platitudes.
                        Glad you said it first. I was going to add, "99% of the wealthy know what the answers to these questions are supposed to be and answer accordingly, regardless of what they really do." In my experience, at least 63% of the wealthy don't know WHEN or IF their kids last read a book, what it was, or WTF their kids are doing while they themselves are at work and/or the club.
                        "Since the historic ruling, the Lovings have become icons for equality. Mildred released a statement on the 40th anniversary of the ruling in 2007: 'I am proud that Richard’s and my name is on a court case that can help reinforce the love, the commitment, the fairness, and the family that so many people, Black or white, young or old, gay or straight, seek in life. I support the freedom to marry for all. That’s what Loving, and loving, are all about.'." - Mildred Loving (Loving v. Virginia)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by phillygirl View Post
                          When I was growing up, long distance calls were a luxury that most of my family did not indulge in. Those phone calls were specifically to inform of a death, a birth, or wish a happy birthday. They were very short in duration, and while we might get on the line to say hello to the grandparents, we better be quick about it, as it was expensive.

                          My great uncle lived in NYC and would come by train to visit us. He might come into Philly train station or Wilmington. He would make a person to person collect call and ask for Mr. Wilmington. We were to say he wasn't there, at which point he would tell the operator that he would call back at 3:28 on Thursday. I'm pretty certain the operator knew the scam.

                          The best was the time he left his glasses at our house, and did the same thing, asking for "Mr. Glass". There was no good answer as responding yes would incur a charge; responding no, to avoid the charge, didn't pass on the information that they were in fact there.

                          Yeah...my family pinched their pennies!
                          I remember doing that!
                          "Since the historic ruling, the Lovings have become icons for equality. Mildred released a statement on the 40th anniversary of the ruling in 2007: 'I am proud that Richard’s and my name is on a court case that can help reinforce the love, the commitment, the fairness, and the family that so many people, Black or white, young or old, gay or straight, seek in life. I support the freedom to marry for all. That’s what Loving, and loving, are all about.'." - Mildred Loving (Loving v. Virginia)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by phillygirl View Post
                            When I was growing up, long distance calls were a luxury that most of my family did not indulge in. Those phone calls were specifically to inform of a death, a birth, or wish a happy birthday. They were very short in duration, and while we might get on the line to say hello to the grandparents, we better be quick about it, as it was expensive.

                            My great uncle lived in NYC and would come by train to visit us. He might come into Philly train station or Wilmington. He would make a person to person collect call and ask for Mr. Wilmington. We were to say he wasn't there, at which point he would tell the operator that he would call back at 3:28 on Thursday. I'm pretty certain the operator knew the scam.

                            The best was the time he left his glasses at our house, and did the same thing, asking for "Mr. Glass". There was no good answer as responding yes would incur a charge; responding no, to avoid the charge, didn't pass on the information that they were in fact there.

                            Yeah...my family pinched their pennies!
                            Heh! The "secret" "I've arrived safely" call. Call collect, ask for "Mr. Johnson" or whomever we decided was the "codeword" for "everything is OK," and then decline the call. I can't even count how many times we did that for one reason or another over the years.
                            It's been ten years since that lonely day I left you
                            In the morning rain, smoking gun in hand
                            Ten lonely years but how my heart, it still remembers
                            Pray for me, momma, I'm a gypsy now

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by phillygirl View Post
                              When I was growing up, long distance calls were a luxury that most of my family did not indulge in. Those phone calls were specifically to inform of a death, a birth, or wish a happy birthday. They were very short in duration, and while we might get on the line to say hello to the grandparents, we better be quick about it, as it was expensive.

                              My great uncle lived in NYC and would come by train to visit us. He might come into Philly train station or Wilmington. He would make a person to person collect call and ask for Mr. Wilmington. We were to say he wasn't there, at which point he would tell the operator that he would call back at 3:28 on Thursday. I'm pretty certain the operator knew the scam.

                              The best was the time he left his glasses at our house, and did the same thing, asking for "Mr. Glass". There was no good answer as responding yes would incur a charge; responding no, to avoid the charge, didn't pass on the information that they were in fact there.

                              Yeah...my family pinched their pennies!
                              It's funny you mention the "person to person" loophole, I doubt there are many people who remember the specifics. This was all a result of federal regulation of telephone charges, and it was all very arbitrary and ineffective but it sure made long distance calling a true "luxury." Packet switching was absolutely possible on a consumer level in the 1970s and there were quite a few enterprising companies that tried to offer this to consumers. They were shot down by federal regulators due to - get this - unfair competition. In the 1970s is was unfair for an upstart to sell long distance plans to consumers that allowed them to dial a local number, enter a code, and bypass the standard process for using wireline resources (and therefore bypassing the fees). But no, AT&T had a regulated monopoly on this sector and well we see how that turned out.

                              The funny part is that AT&T was using packet switching themselves at the same time and was already bypassing the local wirelines and not paying the fees either!
                              "Faith is nothing but a firm assent of the mind : which, if it be regulated, as is our duty, cannot be afforded to anything but upon good reason, and so cannot be opposite to it."
                              -John Locke

                              "It's all been melded together into one giant, authoritarian, leftist scream."
                              -Newman

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