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  • Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organization

    Egypt’s military-backed government declares Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organization

    CAIRO — Egypt’s military-backed government on Wednesday designated the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organization, criminalizing the activities and finances of a movement that rose to power in national elections last year but has been crippled by a government crackdown since a coup in July.

    The announcement was a stunning blow to the decades-old Islamist organization, which survived for years in the shadows and in prison cells under then-President Hosni Mubarak but reached the height of political power after his ouster in the 2011 uprising.

    With the victory last year of Mohamed Morsi — a former Brotherhood leader — in Egypt’s first democratic presidential election, the movement was poised to realize its Islamist project. But it struggled to govern the country’s vast and bloated bureaucracy, and after Morsi’s ouster, it became the target of a campaign of arrests and killings.

    Wednesday’s decree, which accused the Brotherhood of a deadly car bombing outside a security building Tuesday, broadened the government’s authority to move against the group.

    Egyptian legal experts said the decree would shutter hundreds of charities and nongovernmental organizations affiliated with the Brotherhood, one of Egypt’s largest opposition groups. The organizations provide health care and other services to rural and urban areas that lack infrastructure.

    Anyone who is a member of the Brotherhood, participates in its activities or promotes or funds the group will be subject to prosecution under the Egyptian penal code, analysts said. Membership in a terrorist group is punishable by five years in prison. The maximum penalty for providing weapons and ammunition to a domestic terrorist group is death.

    Brotherhood officials could not be reached for comment. But a statement posted on the group’s official Twitter account called Wednesday’s declaration a “worthless decision from an illegal gov’t without any evidence and will not change anything in reality.”

    “The protests are in the streets despite a law restricting them — and killings and prison sentences. All this has not changed the will of the people,” said Ibrahim Elsayed, a member of the Brotherhood’s political group, the Freedom and Justice Party, the Associated Press reported. “The decision has no value for us and is only worth the paper it is written on.”

    The declaration by Egypt’s interim cabinet seems likely to harden further the divide between Morsi’s supporters and secular backers of the government ahead of a referendum on a new constitution scheduled for next month.

    Morsi’s presidency faltered under an already crumbling economy and his controversial efforts to pass a new constitution, further isolating the increasingly unpopular Brotherhood, whose leaders began courting hard-line Islamists to bolster support.


    More at Link
    May we raise children who love the unloved things - the dandelion, the worm, the spiderlings.
    Children who sense the rose needs the thorn and run into rainswept days the same way they turn towards the sun...
    And when they're grown and someone has to speak for those who have no voice,
    may they draw upon that wilder bond, those days of tending tender things and be the one.

  • #2
    After Wednesday’s announcement, the United States expressed concern about “the current atmosphere and its potential effects on a democratic transition in Egypt.”

    “We think it is essential for Egypt to have an inclusive political process; it is the best means of restoring the stability that the Egyptian people want and that is necessary to the country’s economic recovery,” State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said. “There needs to be dialogue and political participation across the political spectrum.”
    In other words, the ignorant, incompetent, starry-eyed children are still in charge of foreign policy.


    A continuation if the spectacular fuck-up that is Obama's so-called "foreign policy." And to think that there were a bunch of mouth-breathing Leftists who claimed that Sarah Palin wasn't qualified! Amazing.


    Children simply cannot be put in charge of foreign policy. They just don't know WTF they're doing.
    It's been ten years since that lonely day I left you
    In the morning rain, smoking gun in hand
    Ten lonely years but how my heart, it still remembers
    Pray for me, momma, I'm a gypsy now

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Adam View Post
      In other words, the ignorant, incompetent, starry-eyed children are still in charge of foreign policy.


      A continuation if the spectacular fuck-up that is Obama's so-called "foreign policy." And to think that there were a bunch of mouth-breathing Leftists who claimed that Sarah Palin wasn't qualified! Amazing.


      Children simply cannot be put in charge of foreign policy. They just don't know WTF they're doing.
      I think the belief goes that stability will only lesson by not being "inclusive." This is where the left needs to be willing to think in black and white. Muslim Brotherhood = Terrorist group.

      Comment


      • #4
        Isn't this exactly what Hosni Mubarak did? Because that didn't turn out so well.
        Enjoy.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Norm dePlume View Post
          Isn't this exactly what Hosni Mubarak did? Because that didn't turn out so well.
          It would have turned out much better if the ignorant, starry-eyed children in charge of so-called foreign policy had not turned their back on our #2 ally in the region. Thousands of lives lost, a once-thriving economy crippled, people living in oppression and fear of violence, a disastrous blow to human rights, and now, four years later, we're right back where we started. All because Obama was too Goddamned stupid to follow the first, most basic rule of foreign policy: have your ally's back.

          And the idiots who cheered this on in the first place are the very ones who claimed that Sarah Palin could not be entrusted with foreign policy because she didn't get a passport when she was 8 years old. She knew that you don't turn your back on your ally, and the Left mocked her mercilessly for it.



          Like I said, the children of the Left simply cannot be entrusted with foreign policy. They don't know WTF they're doing, and they want the world to be how they want it, not how it actually is.
          It's been ten years since that lonely day I left you
          In the morning rain, smoking gun in hand
          Ten lonely years but how my heart, it still remembers
          Pray for me, momma, I'm a gypsy now

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Adam View Post
            It would have turned out much better if the ignorant, starry-eyed children in charge of so-called foreign policy had not turned their back on our #2 ally in the region. Thousands of lives lost, a once-thriving economy crippled, people living in oppression and fear of violence, a disastrous blow to human rights, and now, four years later, we're right back where we started. All because Obama was too Goddamned stupid to follow the first, most basic rule of foreign policy: have your ally's back.

            And the idiots who cheered this on in the first place are the very ones who claimed that Sarah Palin could not be entrusted with foreign policy because she didn't get a passport when she was 8 years old. She knew that you don't turn your back on your ally, and the Left mocked her mercilessly for it.



            Like I said, the children of the Left simply cannot be entrusted with foreign policy. They don't know WTF they're doing, and they want the world to be how they want it, not how it actually is.
            You're saying we should have militarily intervened to help Mubarak crush the uprising?
            Enjoy.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Norm dePlume View Post
              You're saying we should have militarily intervened to help Mubarak crush the uprising?
              No. There was no need for military intervention. All we had to do was back him diplomatically and the uprising would have died on its own, and there would have been elections and a peaceful transfer of power back in September of 2011, when elections were scheduled. All in the world Obama had to do was use the bully pulpit to say to Mubarak, Egypt, and the world that elections were scheduled, and the US intended to see those elections through, and that their ally, Mubarak, would do as he said he would with the elections. It's not even difficult to couch a stern warning to Mubarak in such a statement to follow through with his promise of free and open elections.

              Instead, Obama dithered briefly, then effectively slammed the US' door in Mubarak's face. And in doing so, he led the rest of the Western world, at a bare minimum, to abandon Mubarak and Egypt.


              It was, just as I said than and say now, a colossal foreign policy fuck-up because a bunch of ignorant, starry-eyed children were in charge.
              It's been ten years since that lonely day I left you
              In the morning rain, smoking gun in hand
              Ten lonely years but how my heart, it still remembers
              Pray for me, momma, I'm a gypsy now

              Comment


              • #8
                I think you're putting a lot of eggs in one guy's basket. The power structure stayed intact in Egypt through the election. Mubarak himself was an unnecessary irritant in the situation. Egypt is our ally, not Mubarak.
                Enjoy.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Norm dePlume View Post
                  I think you're putting a lot of eggs in one guy's basket. The power structure stayed intact in Egypt through the election. Mubarak himself was an unnecessary irritant in the situation. Egypt is our ally, not Mubarak.
                  Mubarak wasn't known for acting like a human being to his people either. And what? We were supposed to defend him based on the belief that he would allow elections? Really?

                  People act like a revolution shouldn't have happened just because they didn't get it right the first time. Countries usually don't get it right the first time. I'm sorry that the Muslim Brotherhood took control for a while (thanks to elections, so they did it to themselves). Egyptians realized their mistake and overthrew them again. LET THEM FIGHT FOR THEIR FREEDOM. It's what we did. It's what others have done for centuries. Egypt doesn't need a big brother. They need a fighting chance. That doesn't mean we should keep giving them aid, but it does mean we shouldn't put down their fighting for a revolution. Unless you (generic you) live under that type of tyranny, you can't judge Egypt for their faults.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Norm dePlume View Post
                    I think you're putting a lot of eggs in one guy's basket. The power structure stayed intact in Egypt through the election. Mubarak himself was an unnecessary irritant in the situation. Egypt is our ally, not Mubarak.
                    So black and white. The tables have truly turned.
                    "Faith is nothing but a firm assent of the mind : which, if it be regulated, as is our duty, cannot be afforded to anything but upon good reason, and so cannot be opposite to it."
                    -John Locke

                    "It's all been melded together into one giant, authoritarian, leftist scream."
                    -Newman

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by scott View Post
                      So black and white. The tables have truly turned.
                      It's not black and white at all. We may have missed some opportunities to promote a better outcome, but supporting Mubarak wasn't one. And Hillary Clinton may be a lot of things, but she isn't childish.
                      Last edited by Norm dePlume; Thursday, January 2, 2014, 2:47 AM.
                      Enjoy.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Lanie View Post
                        Mubarak wasn't known for acting like a human being to his people either. And what? We were supposed to defend him based on the belief that he would allow elections? Really?
                        We were supposed to back him because he was our second-closest ally in the region.

                        Originally posted by Lanie View Post
                        People act like a revolution shouldn't have happened just because they didn't get it right the first time. Countries usually don't get it right the first time. I'm sorry that the Muslim Brotherhood took control for a while (thanks to elections, so they did it to themselves). Egyptians realized their mistake and overthrew them again. LET THEM FIGHT FOR THEIR FREEDOM. It's what we did. It's what others have done for centuries. Egypt doesn't need a big brother. They need a fighting chance. That doesn't mean we should keep giving them aid, but it does mean we shouldn't put down their fighting for a revolution. Unless you (generic you) live under that type of tyranny, you can't judge Egypt for their faults.
                        That's simply not how foreign policy works. This is why adults need to be in charge of foreign policy, not starry-eyed children.
                        It's been ten years since that lonely day I left you
                        In the morning rain, smoking gun in hand
                        Ten lonely years but how my heart, it still remembers
                        Pray for me, momma, I'm a gypsy now

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Norm dePlume View Post
                          It's not black and white at all. We may have missed some opportunities to promote a better outcome, but supporting Mubarak wasn't one. And Hillary Clinton may be a lot of things, but she isn't childish.
                          LOL! What difference does it make?
                          It's been ten years since that lonely day I left you
                          In the morning rain, smoking gun in hand
                          Ten lonely years but how my heart, it still remembers
                          Pray for me, momma, I'm a gypsy now

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'm not completely sure what you mean by starry-eyed, but I don't think Hillary is that, either.
                            Enjoy.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              It's the revolution that can't stop revolving.

                              Egypt crisis: Multiple explosions rock Cairo

                              At least six people have been killed and some 100 more injured in four explosions in the Egyptian capital, Cairo.

                              Militants have stepped up their campaign against security forces, with the attacks coming on the eve of the third anniversary of the 2011 uprising.
                              Enjoy.

                              Comment

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