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Parent Left ‘Speechless’ After Reading the ‘Field Day’ Flyer

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  • Parent Left ‘Speechless’ After Reading the ‘Field Day’ Flyer

    Parent Left ‘Speechless’ After Reading the ‘Field Day’ Flyer Reportedly Sent Home by Daughter’s School
    May. 22, 2014 4:59pm Jason Howerton
    21.5K

    Parents of students at North Hill Elementary in Rochester Hills, Michigan, have reportedly been informed that all students are “winners,” therefore the “competitive ‘urge to win’ will be kept to a minimum” at the school’s annual field day.

    The flyer, flagged by Progressives Today, reads in part:

    The purpose of the day is for our school to get together for an enjoyable two hours of activities and provide an opportunity for students, teachers and parents to interact cooperatively. Since we believe that all of our children are winners, the need for athletic ability and the competitive “urge to win” will be kept to a minimum. The real reward will be the enjoyment and good feelings of participation.
    Bennett Staph, who claims to be a parent with a child at the school, reportedly posted a photo of the field day notice on Facebook. She said she was “proud” of her daughter for “pointing out the ridiculousness of it.”

    “I am speechless…the ‘urge to win’ will be kept at a minimum. What are we teaching our children? Everyone isn’t a winner, there are winners and losers. The kids that win and get awards drive those that don’t to do better,” Staph wrote, according to the website.

    TheBlaze has reached out to North Hill Elementary and will update this story with any relevant information.
    I thought a 'field day' was a day set aside for multiple athletic competitions. Did the definition radically change a few minutes ago? A non-competitive outdoor event is a 'picnic' or perhaps 'loitering'.

    The Blaze
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

  • #2
    Mongol General: Hao! Dai ye! We won again! This is good, but what is best in life?

    Mongol: The open steppe, fleet horse, falcons at your wrist, and the wind in your hair.

    Mongol General: Wrong! Conan! What is best in life?

    Conan: To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of their women.

    Mongol General: That is good! That is good.
    Colonel Vogel : What does the diary tell you that it doesn't tell us?

    Professor Henry Jones : It tells me, that goose-stepping morons like yourself should try *reading* books instead of *burning* them!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Gingersnap View Post
      I thought a 'field day' was a day set aside for multiple athletic competitions. Did the definition radically change a few minutes ago? A non-competitive outdoor event is a 'picnic' or perhaps 'loitering'.

      The Blaze
      More idiotic "non-competitive competition" from the purveyors of Cosmic Sameness. Better known as "losers."

      Originally posted by Billy Jingo View Post
      Mongol General: Hao! Dai ye! We won again! This is good, but what is best in life?

      Mongol: The open steppe, fleet horse, falcons at your wrist, and the wind in your hair.

      Mongol General: Wrong! Conan! What is best in life?

      Conan: To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of their women.

      Mongol General: That is good! That is good.
      They seem to take the three-legged-race far more seriously in Arkansas than they do around here.
      It's been ten years since that lonely day I left you
      In the morning rain, smoking gun in hand
      Ten lonely years but how my heart, it still remembers
      Pray for me, momma, I'm a gypsy now

      Comment


      • #4
        I feel the same way about Field Day that I felt about Cub Scouts. I'd rather spend the time in my play clothes with my friends running around, riding bikes, and having our own projects, challenges, and competitions.
        The year's at the spring
        And day's at the morn;
        Morning's at seven;
        The hill-side's dew-pearled;
        The lark's on the wing;
        The snail's on the thorn:
        God's in his heaven—
        All's right with the world!

        Comment


        • #5
          I never cared much one way or the other as long as I wasn't stuck in a classroom. I'm fine with schools dumping field days but get rid of the name when you create a new event. Call it a school festival or something.
          "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Gingersnap View Post
            I never cared much one way or the other as long as I wasn't stuck in a classroom. I'm fine with schools dumping field days but get rid of the name when you create a new event. Call it a school festival or something.
            Check out this bullshit:

            wiki

            Controversies[edit]
            There have been a number of controversies surrounding school sports days in recent years, many of which have been publicised by the media.

            Some schools have abolished or heavily altered sports days on the grounds that they are too competitive and may damage pupils' self esteem. This often reflects the schools' attitude towards competitive sports or competitiveness in general. This view has been condemned as "political correctness" by many commentators, notably by journalist Melanie Phillips in her 1996 book All Must Have Prizes.[2]

            In June 2005, Country Life magazine published a report claiming that school sports days have become excessively competitive due to overbearing and "over-zealous" parents, who place too much pressure on their children to succeed. The report also revealed that many schools have banned "mothers and fathers" races due to fighting and cheating.

            Since the mid-1990s, a number of schools and education authorities have banned photography and filming with video cameras at sports days and other school events. Some authorities cite general privacy issues as justification for the ban. Others have raised concerns about pedophiles, which in turn has sparked accusations of hysteria and moral panic. Many parents have expressed anger at being unable to take photographs or videos as souvenirs of these events, and the ban has been criticised by some as a paranoid over-reaction to public concerns about pedophilia and child safety issues.
            The year's at the spring
            And day's at the morn;
            Morning's at seven;
            The hill-side's dew-pearled;
            The lark's on the wing;
            The snail's on the thorn:
            God's in his heaven—
            All's right with the world!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Novaheart View Post
              Check out this bullshit:

              wiki

              Controversies[edit]
              There have been a number of controversies surrounding school sports days in recent years, many of which have been publicised by the media.

              Some schools have abolished or heavily altered sports days on the grounds that they are too competitive and may damage pupils' self esteem. This often reflects the schools' attitude towards competitive sports or competitiveness in general. This view has been condemned as "political correctness" by many commentators, notably by journalist Melanie Phillips in her 1996 book All Must Have Prizes.[2]

              In June 2005, Country Life magazine published a report claiming that school sports days have become excessively competitive due to overbearing and "over-zealous" parents, who place too much pressure on their children to succeed. The report also revealed that many schools have banned "mothers and fathers" races due to fighting and cheating.

              Since the mid-1990s, a number of schools and education authorities have banned photography and filming with video cameras at sports days and other school events. Some authorities cite general privacy issues as justification for the ban. Others have raised concerns about pedophiles, which in turn has sparked accusations of hysteria and moral panic. Many parents have expressed anger at being unable to take photographs or videos as souvenirs of these events, and the ban has been criticised by some as a paranoid over-reaction to public concerns about pedophilia and child safety issues.
              Parents weren't invited to Field Day when I was in school. In fact, parents weren't invited to school at all, except for rare occasions like the school play and when the standardized test scores came out. Parents were considered interference.

              I hated Field Day. It was the day after Memorial Day, the last day of school, HOT, and I was ready for school to be OVER and to spend most of the summer in shorts or a swimsuit. Instead, I was at school, outdoors all day in the heat, in a fucking dress (concession to the nature of the event being that we were allowed to wear shorts UNDER our dresses and wear sneakers instead of the usual oxfords. And none of the events were the kind of thing I was good at. No baseball, swimming, biking, skating or other fun stuff. Just boring crap like long jump and chinning competitions.
              "Since the historic ruling, the Lovings have become icons for equality. Mildred released a statement on the 40th anniversary of the ruling in 2007: 'I am proud that Richard’s and my name is on a court case that can help reinforce the love, the commitment, the fairness, and the family that so many people, Black or white, young or old, gay or straight, seek in life. I support the freedom to marry for all. That’s what Loving, and loving, are all about.'." - Mildred Loving (Loving v. Virginia)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Celeste Chalfonte View Post
                Parents weren't invited to Field Day when I was in school. In fact, parents weren't invited to school at all, except for rare occasions like the school play and when the standardized test scores came out. Parents were considered interference.

                I hated Field Day. It was the day after Memorial Day, the last day of school, HOT, and I was ready for school to be OVER and to spend most of the summer in shorts or a swimsuit. Instead, I was at school, outdoors all day in the heat, in a fucking dress (concession to the nature of the event being that we were allowed to wear shorts UNDER our dresses and wear sneakers instead of the usual oxfords. And none of the events were the kind of thing I was good at. No baseball, swimming, biking, skating or other fun stuff. Just boring crap like long jump and chinning competitions.
                Field Day for us was basically a ruse to give teachers (and administrators, as appropriate) an opportunity to talk to a parent in an informal setting, sort of a "post-game wrap-up" on the year. None of us realized it at the time, but while we were doing tug-of-war or sack races or whatever, teachers would discretely take parents aside for a moment and just give them a run-down: "little Timmy did well in reading this year, he has done well with addition, subtraction, and multiplication, but he's still struggling a little bit with division," etc. It was, in short, a more personable way for teachers to interact with parents about their kid's educational needs and make some suggestions for the summer and the following year. In retrospect, it seems like a pretty good idea to me.

                It was also a case of kids having fun and competing, because when I went to school, competition was considered a good thing and we all found it to be fun, even if it was something we didn't "normally" do, like a tug-of-war. It was a case of both character-building and team-building lessons, and both the kids and the parents had a lot of laughs out of the whole event at the same time. I can think of worse ways to spend a day in school.
                It's been ten years since that lonely day I left you
                In the morning rain, smoking gun in hand
                Ten lonely years but how my heart, it still remembers
                Pray for me, momma, I'm a gypsy now

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Celeste Chalfonte View Post
                  Parents weren't invited to Field Day when I was in school. In fact, parents weren't invited to school at all, except for rare occasions like the school play and when the standardized test scores came out. Parents were considered interference.

                  I hated Field Day. It was the day after Memorial Day, the last day of school, HOT, and I was ready for school to be OVER and to spend most of the summer in shorts or a swimsuit. Instead, I was at school, outdoors all day in the heat, in a fucking dress (concession to the nature of the event being that we were allowed to wear shorts UNDER our dresses and wear sneakers instead of the usual oxfords. And none of the events were the kind of thing I was good at. No baseball, swimming, biking, skating or other fun stuff. Just boring crap like long jump and chinning competitions.
                  I've been scratching my brain trying to remember our field days. I think they were more similar to yours, with parents not being invited. I was allowed to wear pants or shorts to school that day, so that was a plus. As far as athletic events, I was relatively (for me) good at the long jump, chinning competitions and relay running events, so that was also a plus for me. I"m sure we had our log fight competition as well...and I was pretty good at that, for my size (usually I was the smallest or second smallest in the class...but I could usually beat a majority of the girls and a few of the boys because my balance was better than most). While I remember liking field day, I don't recall it being a huge positive or a huge negative in my life. I certainly wasn't going to win first place in most events (other than the flexed arm hang...I took the title in 6th grade for the girls) but I also don't recall the winning part of it being such a big deal. Sure, ultimately there were winners, but it really didn't overshadow the more important part which was simply competing and spending the day outside while doing so.

                  I'm not certain why there seems to be such emphasis on one extreme or the other with kids and competition. We managed to have competition, awarding trophies only to those that won, without permanently scarring those that didn't. And we managed to do so without having the parents overly involved in the process.
                  Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
                  Robert Southwell, S.J.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Another one for parent-less field days. Not only were no parents invited, it's unlikely many would have turned up since it was during the workday. My goal in any field day competition was to be excluded early on so I could talk with my friends or surreptitiously play cards or something. Let's face it, in any class only 2 or 3 kids were seriously competitive athletically so the rest of us really didn't care - we just liked the novelty. That's fine.

                    I can't imagine my folks being impressed by a blue ribbon for a sack race.
                    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Gingersnap View Post
                      Another one for parent-less field days. Not only were no parents invited, it's unlikely many would have turned up since it was during the workday. My goal in any field day competition was to be excluded early on so I could talk with my friends or surreptitiously play cards or something. Let's face it, in any class only 2 or 3 kids were seriously competitive athletically so the rest of us really didn't care - we just liked the novelty. That's fine.

                      I can't imagine my folks being impressed by a blue ribbon for a sack race.
                      Exactly! Although my only actual trophy ever in life was for a sack race on 4th of July in 1976. We were visiting good friends in St. Louis and went to a fantastic community barbecue. I was 10 years old. Our friends had 8 kids and we absolutely loved going to see them on vacation because they were so much fun. Jimmy was my age and he was my partner for the sack race. To this day he still loves telling the story of the 2 of us, the youngest on the field, being somewhere around the middle of the pack. Suddenly, pair after pair started to trip and fall. I turned to him and growled..."Get a move on, we can win this thing!" He said my tone and the look in my eyes put the fear of God in him. I had that trophy for forever About 20 years ago I had wrapped it up and gave it to him as a wedding present...he laughed so hard when he unwrapped it. He and I both could remember the race like it was yesterday!
                      Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
                      Robert Southwell, S.J.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I did win $5 once for catching a greased pig in rural Illinois during a festival when I was five.

                        Now every kid gets a trophy, I would love to be a trophy vendor for a few school districts and little league districts.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          At our elementary, if you want to participate you can..if not, you don't. You can sit on the hill all day long reading a book if that's your thing. Teachers and aides serve lunch to the kids (hamburgers and hotdogs - locally raised beef and Mennonite bakery breads which are donated).

                          Parents who volunteer are in charge of the different activities otherwise, no parents attend. Some activities are competitive (no ribbons or..trophies, really..trophies? You just win and that seems to be good enough for the kids) and some aren't. Anything involving water are the most popular events especially the water balloon contest between the kids and the teachers.

                          Sometimes adults make life so complicated for kids.
                          Last edited by Michele; Saturday, May 24, 2014, 6:43 AM.
                          May we raise children who love the unloved things - the dandelion, the worm, the spiderlings.
                          Children who sense the rose needs the thorn and run into rainswept days the same way they turn towards the sun...
                          And when they're grown and someone has to speak for those who have no voice,
                          may they draw upon that wilder bond, those days of tending tender things and be the one.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Adam View Post
                            Field Day for us was basically a ruse to give teachers (and administrators, as appropriate) an opportunity to talk to a parent in an informal setting, sort of a "post-game wrap-up" on the year. None of us realized it at the time, but while we were doing tug-of-war or sack races or whatever, teachers would discretely take parents aside for a moment and just give them a run-down: "little Timmy did well in reading this year, he has done well with addition, subtraction, and multiplication, but he's still struggling a little bit with division," etc. It was, in short, a more personable way for teachers to interact with parents about their kid's educational needs and make some suggestions for the summer and the following year. In retrospect, it seems like a pretty good idea to me.

                            It was also a case of kids having fun and competing, because when I went to school, competition was considered a good thing and we all found it to be fun, even if it was something we didn't "normally" do, like a tug-of-war. It was a case of both character-building and team-building lessons, and both the kids and the parents had a lot of laughs out of the whole event at the same time. I can think of worse ways to spend a day in school.
                            Then they should have done it some time other than one of the last days of the school year. I might have enjoyed it in November. BTW, I appreciate the tribute to veterans, but this particular background makes it extremely difficult to navigate; maybe it's just me. I can barely see the buttons.
                            The year's at the spring
                            And day's at the morn;
                            Morning's at seven;
                            The hill-side's dew-pearled;
                            The lark's on the wing;
                            The snail's on the thorn:
                            God's in his heaven—
                            All's right with the world!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Novaheart View Post
                              Then they should have done it some time other than one of the last days of the school year. I might have enjoyed it in November. BTW, I appreciate the tribute to veterans, but this particular background makes it extremely difficult to navigate; maybe it's just me. I can barely see the buttons.
                              Better?

                              Comment

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