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  • Why Boys Should Start School a Year Later Than Girls

    The reason little boys wear almost all of the red shirts is not mysterious; the fact that boys mature later than girls is one known to every parent, and certainly to every teacher. According to a Rand survey, teachers are three times more likely to delay entry for their own sons than their own daughters. The maturity gap is now demonstrated conclusively by neuroscience: Brain development follows a different trajectory for boys than it does for girls. But this fact is entirely ignored in broader education policy, even as boys fall further behind girls in the classroom.

    On almost every measure of educational success from pre-K to postgrad, boys and young men now lag well behind their female classmates. The trend is so pronounced that it can result only from structural problems. Affluent parents and elite schools are tackling the issue by giving boys more time. But in fact it is boys from poorer backgrounds who struggle the most in the classroom, and these boys, who could benefit most from the gift of time, are the ones least likely to receive it. Public schools usually follow an industrial model, enrolling children automatically based on their birth date. Administrators in the public system rarely have the luxury of conversations with parents about school readiness.
    Longish article, well worth the time to read it all.
    "Since the historic ruling, the Lovings have become icons for equality. Mildred released a statement on the 40th anniversary of the ruling in 2007: 'I am proud that Richard’s and my name is on a court case that can help reinforce the love, the commitment, the fairness, and the family that so many people, Black or white, young or old, gay or straight, seek in life. I support the freedom to marry for all. That’s what Loving, and loving, are all about.'." - Mildred Loving (Loving v. Virginia)

  • #2
    It’s another reason why single sex schools are a good thing. I do fear we are failing our boys in so many ways. The delayed start is interesting and makes sense.
    Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
    Robert Southwell, S.J.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by phillygirl View Post
      It’s another reason why single sex schools are a good thing. I do fear we are failing our boys in so many ways. The delayed start is interesting and makes sense.
      Apparently, at least according to the author, the results of delaying the start of school a year are immediate, measurable, and far more reproducible than any such gains from single-sex schooling. I do think truly parallel, single-sex options should be available, but this is something that could be implemented widely, immediately, and without any significant investment other than, perhaps a year of public daycare or pre-K geared specifically to boys (i.e., no "come in, sit down, and shut up").
      "Since the historic ruling, the Lovings have become icons for equality. Mildred released a statement on the 40th anniversary of the ruling in 2007: 'I am proud that Richard’s and my name is on a court case that can help reinforce the love, the commitment, the fairness, and the family that so many people, Black or white, young or old, gay or straight, seek in life. I support the freedom to marry for all. That’s what Loving, and loving, are all about.'." - Mildred Loving (Loving v. Virginia)

      Comment


      • #4
        In a study drawing on scores across the country, Sean Reardon, a sociologist and education professor at Stanford, found no overall gender difference in math in grades three through eight, but a big one in English. “In virtually every school district in the U.S., female students outperformed male students on ELA [English Language Arts] tests,” he writes. “In the average district, the gap is … roughly two-thirds of a grade level.”
        I find that kind of interesting because it's the exact opposite of my experience.

        For comparison's sake, I'm an October birthday, so I entered school "late," technically speaking, which means that I turned 18 early in my senior year. But particularly in the lower grades, I found almost universally that girls in the class just blew me away at math, whereas I never had even the slightest trouble with English/reading/comprehension/etc., "language arts," as they called it at the time (handwriting was a different story: my mother had the handwriting of a royal calligrapher, and I have the handwriting of a serial killer; I guess that gene of hers didn't take). Then again, I was bored to tears with history and "social sciences" until late in high school and really didn't get a big interest in it until college. And, at the same time, halfway through high school, I really was great at geometry/trig, but many of the girls in my class struggled with it.
        It's been ten years since that lonely day I left you
        In the morning rain, smoking gun in hand
        Ten lonely years but how my heart, it still remembers
        Pray for me, momma, I'm a gypsy now

        Comment


        • #5
          If gender was a social construct, this article would be bullshit.

          Mark
          Race Card: A tool of the intellectually weak and lazy when they cannot counter a logical argument or factual data.

          "Liberals have to stop insisting that the world is what they want it to be instead of the way it is." - Bill Maher

          Political correctness is ideological fascism. It’s the antithesis of freedom. Dr. Piper

          Gender is not a "Social Construct", it is an outgrowth of biological reality.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by 80zephyr View Post
            If gender was a social construct, this article would be bullshit.
            For chrissakes, man, can you leave your frigging crusade out of Just. One. Thread?
            "Since the historic ruling, the Lovings have become icons for equality. Mildred released a statement on the 40th anniversary of the ruling in 2007: 'I am proud that Richard’s and my name is on a court case that can help reinforce the love, the commitment, the fairness, and the family that so many people, Black or white, young or old, gay or straight, seek in life. I support the freedom to marry for all. That’s what Loving, and loving, are all about.'." - Mildred Loving (Loving v. Virginia)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Celeste Chalfonte View Post

              For chrissakes, man, can you leave your frigging crusade out of Just. One. Thread?
              What crusade would that be?

              Maybe you should look at my posting history. You don't agree with me, so i am on a "crusade"

              Lol.

              Mark
              Race Card: A tool of the intellectually weak and lazy when they cannot counter a logical argument or factual data.

              "Liberals have to stop insisting that the world is what they want it to be instead of the way it is." - Bill Maher

              Political correctness is ideological fascism. It’s the antithesis of freedom. Dr. Piper

              Gender is not a "Social Construct", it is an outgrowth of biological reality.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by 80zephyr View Post
                If gender was a social construct, this article would be bullshit.

                Mark
                • "Florida is where Woke goes to die." — Ron DeSantis.
                • "We must make sure we don’t give platforms to those lying to our faces." — Brian Stelter, leading by example.
                • “I have absolutely no intention of the Democrats not winning the House in November." — Nancy Pelosi, explaining power.
                • "Don't underestimate Joe's ability to fuck things up."— Barack Obama's 1st Rule of Joe Biden.
                • "Put aside all of these issues of concern about liberties and personal liberties and realize we have a common enemy and that common enemy is the virus." — Dr. Anthony Fauci, misquoting Pogo.
                • "The way I see it, there's always, c'mon, there's always money. It's there." — Elizabeth Warren, explaining socialism.
                • "The interesting thing about the Green New Deal is it wasn't originally a climate thing at all.... We really think of it as a how-do-you-change-the-entire-economy thing." — Saikat Chakrabarti, then AOC's Chief of Staff.
                • "We have to stop demonizing people and realize the biggest terror threat in this country is white men, most of them radicalized to the right, and we have to start doing something about them." — CNN's Don Lemon, showing how to stop demonizing people.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by 80zephyr View Post

                  What crusade would that be?

                  Maybe you should look at my posting history. You don't agree with me, so i am on a "crusade"

                  Lol.

                  Mark
                  At least I've given up on trying to get you to use the subjunctive properly...or at all.
                  "Since the historic ruling, the Lovings have become icons for equality. Mildred released a statement on the 40th anniversary of the ruling in 2007: 'I am proud that Richard’s and my name is on a court case that can help reinforce the love, the commitment, the fairness, and the family that so many people, Black or white, young or old, gay or straight, seek in life. I support the freedom to marry for all. That’s what Loving, and loving, are all about.'." - Mildred Loving (Loving v. Virginia)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Celeste Chalfonte View Post
                    Well, longish it may be but it's not new, so I'll go with my residual impressions from earlier encounters.

                    I believe what they want—dress it up in whatever multisyllabic syndromic language you choose—is boys to be docile. They want them to sit still and behave. Traditionally boys were simply tortured until they complied. My late father-in-law endured hair-pulling, ear-twisting, and monsoons of knuckle-rapping before he was able to drop of school, probably with undiagnosed ADD or something.

                    I strongly suspect there will be an unavoidable stigma attached to starting school a year later than some other group, and I really don't see that teachers will be happy to see rambunctious boys at any age. Classroom management is the biggest quotidian challenge, lofty ideals notwithstanding. You are evaluated on classroom management skills and scores, not your ideals.

                    I once read a short story or book that began with a teacher in his version of heaven, lecturing monotonously to a crowded hall of rapt pupils, with no disturbances to the musty air at all. And I recall in the movie The Blackboard Jungle, I think it was, starring Sidney Poitier as the teacher, a moment when he the teacher was writing on the blackboard (with his back to the class, already a non-no in modern classrooms) when a wadded-up piece of paper hit the blackboard beside him. He stopped short and slowly turned to face the class, which sat frozen in dread, at which point I was laughing and I don't remember what happened next.

                    Anyway, I think there'll be a very negative onus to starting late, being "not ready" for school, and I don't think teachers will be mollified by the difference. Boys will still be different and have to be hammered into the slots girls fit.

                    My own two cents is that the education establishment has leaned way over toward a female paradigm that emphasizes collaboration, teamwork, group identity and such (I think this is illusory, but that's beside the point here), and dramatically de-emphasizes competition and individual effort and achievement, something I suspect little boys really take to.
                    • "Florida is where Woke goes to die." — Ron DeSantis.
                    • "We must make sure we don’t give platforms to those lying to our faces." — Brian Stelter, leading by example.
                    • “I have absolutely no intention of the Democrats not winning the House in November." — Nancy Pelosi, explaining power.
                    • "Don't underestimate Joe's ability to fuck things up."— Barack Obama's 1st Rule of Joe Biden.
                    • "Put aside all of these issues of concern about liberties and personal liberties and realize we have a common enemy and that common enemy is the virus." — Dr. Anthony Fauci, misquoting Pogo.
                    • "The way I see it, there's always, c'mon, there's always money. It's there." — Elizabeth Warren, explaining socialism.
                    • "The interesting thing about the Green New Deal is it wasn't originally a climate thing at all.... We really think of it as a how-do-you-change-the-entire-economy thing." — Saikat Chakrabarti, then AOC's Chief of Staff.
                    • "We have to stop demonizing people and realize the biggest terror threat in this country is white men, most of them radicalized to the right, and we have to start doing something about them." — CNN's Don Lemon, showing how to stop demonizing people.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Celeste Chalfonte View Post

                      At least I've given up on trying to get you to use the subjunctive properly...or at all.
                      Boys don't do English well. Lol.

                      Mark
                      Race Card: A tool of the intellectually weak and lazy when they cannot counter a logical argument or factual data.

                      "Liberals have to stop insisting that the world is what they want it to be instead of the way it is." - Bill Maher

                      Political correctness is ideological fascism. It’s the antithesis of freedom. Dr. Piper

                      Gender is not a "Social Construct", it is an outgrowth of biological reality.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 80zephyr View Post

                        Boys don't do English well. Lol.

                        Mark


                        Oh my. Maybe that's why Shakespeare had to make up his own words a lot?
                        • "Florida is where Woke goes to die." — Ron DeSantis.
                        • "We must make sure we don’t give platforms to those lying to our faces." — Brian Stelter, leading by example.
                        • “I have absolutely no intention of the Democrats not winning the House in November." — Nancy Pelosi, explaining power.
                        • "Don't underestimate Joe's ability to fuck things up."— Barack Obama's 1st Rule of Joe Biden.
                        • "Put aside all of these issues of concern about liberties and personal liberties and realize we have a common enemy and that common enemy is the virus." — Dr. Anthony Fauci, misquoting Pogo.
                        • "The way I see it, there's always, c'mon, there's always money. It's there." — Elizabeth Warren, explaining socialism.
                        • "The interesting thing about the Green New Deal is it wasn't originally a climate thing at all.... We really think of it as a how-do-you-change-the-entire-economy thing." — Saikat Chakrabarti, then AOC's Chief of Staff.
                        • "We have to stop demonizing people and realize the biggest terror threat in this country is white men, most of them radicalized to the right, and we have to start doing something about them." — CNN's Don Lemon, showing how to stop demonizing people.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Newman View Post

                          Well, longish it may be but it's not new, so I'll go with my residual impressions from earlier encounters.

                          I believe what they want—dress it up in whatever multisyllabic syndromic language you choose—is boys to be docile. They want them to sit still and behave. Traditionally boys were simply tortured until they complied. My late father-in-law endured hair-pulling, ear-twisting, and monsoons of knuckle-rapping before he was able to drop of school, probably with undiagnosed ADD or something.

                          I strongly suspect there will be an unavoidable stigma attached to starting school a year later than some other group, and I really don't see that teachers will be happy to see rambunctious boys at any age. Classroom management is the biggest quotidian challenge, lofty ideals notwithstanding. You are evaluated on classroom management skills and scores, not your ideals.

                          I once read a short story or book that began with a teacher in his version of heaven, lecturing monotonously to a crowded hall of rapt pupils, with no disturbances to the musty air at all. And I recall in the movie The Blackboard Jungle, I think it was, starring Sidney Poitier as the teacher, a moment when he the teacher was writing on the blackboard (with his back to the class, already a non-no in modern classrooms) when a wadded-up piece of paper hit the blackboard beside him. He stopped short and slowly turned to face the class, which sat frozen in dread, at which point I was laughing and I don't remember what happened next.

                          Anyway, I think there'll be a very negative onus to starting late, being "not ready" for school, and I don't think teachers will be mollified by the difference. Boys will still be different and have to be hammered into the slots girls fit.

                          My own two cents is that the education establishment has leaned way over toward a female paradigm that emphasizes collaboration, teamwork, group identity and such (I think this is illusory, but that's beside the point here), and dramatically de-emphasizes competition and individual effort and achievement, something I suspect little boys really take to.
                          A friend of mine was "held back" in second grade. She had switched from parochial school in a "lesser" area to a very good public school. She also simply was not that bright. She is now 55 years old. She has never gotten over getting "held back". She can name every other kid that was ever held back before graduation. I mostly can as well. There is a stigma. Having said that, it makes far more sense to look at a delay rather than getting them to second, fourth, fifth grade, in order to avoid the stigma.

                          I agree with you on the other points, though. We teach to girls now. Boys need recess. They need battle history films. They need Beowulf instead of Billy's sonnets. And I've always hated "group" projects. Just let me be in charge and be done with it. It will get done. And it will be correct. If somebody wants to provide the artwork to go along with the project, fine...other than that, I do not work well with others.
                          Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
                          Robert Southwell, S.J.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by phillygirl View Post

                            Just let me be in charge and be done with it.
                            WOW, my Brother must have really influenced you at those halloween parties.
                            If it pays, it stays

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Frostbit View Post

                              WOW, my Brother must have really influenced you at those halloween parties.
                              Is he like that too?
                              Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
                              Robert Southwell, S.J.

                              Comment

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