Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Darn those Koch brother millionaires using their money to buy influence!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Darn those Koch brother millionaires using their money to buy influence!



    The Obama administration once again has punted on a final decision for the Keystone XL pipeline, announcing ahead of the holiday weekend it is extending a key review period indefinitely -- a move that could push off a determination until after the midterm elections.

    Republicans, as well as red-state Democrats who want the proposed Canada-to-Texas pipeline approved, slammed the administration for the delay. Democrats even threatened to find ways to go around the president to get the project approved.

    "It's absolutely ridiculous that this well over five year long process is continuing for an undetermined amount of time," Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., said in a statement.

    Republican Nebraska Rep. Lee Terry called the decision "shameful," noting that another spring construction season will come and go without the project.

    [....]

    The administration has faced pressure from both sides of the debate on the pipeline. Republicans largely are united in support of the project, but Democrats are sharply divided. Moderate Democrats, as well as labor unions, are pressing the State Department to give the thumbs-up, calling the project a jobs engine and a way to boost energy security. But environmental interests, and lawmakers allied with them, are strongly opposed -- citing its alleged impact on climate change and possible health risks.

    One such environmentalist, California billionaire Tom Steyer, has been vowing to back vulnerable Democrats with big money if they oppose the pipeline. He called the latest announcement "good news on Good Friday for those who oppose Keystone as not being in our nation's best interest."


    Interesting.

    Standing up against the monied special interests by ... being a monied special interest. Of course, the best way to become a monied special interest is to get phenomenally wealthy off of government contracts. Like, you know, "green energy."


    Imagine that.
    It's been ten years since that lonely day I left you
    In the morning rain, smoking gun in hand
    Ten lonely years but how my heart, it still remembers
    Pray for me, momma, I'm a gypsy now

  • #2
    I used to think that if tax-payers only knew the convoluted cronyism and monetary corruption of Big Green at Federal, State, and local levels, they would abandon the cause.

    I kind of don't think that anymore. Americans don't care about corruption unless........well, we don't care.
    "Alexa, slaughter the fatted calf."

    Comment


    • #3


      Steyer: 100M bucks for Democrats if you kill the pipeline.
      Obama: Won't I look corrupt?
      Steyer: Have Harry scream Koch 150 times for cover.
      May we raise children who love the unloved things - the dandelion, the worm, the spiderlings.
      Children who sense the rose needs the thorn and run into rainswept days the same way they turn towards the sun...
      And when they're grown and someone has to speak for those who have no voice,
      may they draw upon that wilder bond, those days of tending tender things and be the one.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hey, that's the system you rooted for. Maybe you'll feel better if you just read Justice Roberts' McCutcheon decision again. Especially this part:

        Spending large sums of money in connection with elections, but not in connection with an effort to control the exercise of an officeholder's official duties, does not give rise to such quid pro quo corruption. Nor does the possibility that an individual who spends large sums may garner "influence over or access to" elected officials or political parties.
        Unlimited donations. Enjoy.
        Enjoy.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Norm dePlume View Post
          Hey, that's the system you rooted for. Maybe you'll feel better if you just read Justice Roberts' McCutcheon decision again. Especially this part:



          Unlimited donations. Enjoy.
          The issue isn't that a billionaire environmentalist gets to use his money, it's that the same people who take it are the ones screaming about other people using their money too.
          "Faith is nothing but a firm assent of the mind : which, if it be regulated, as is our duty, cannot be afforded to anything but upon good reason, and so cannot be opposite to it."
          -John Locke

          "It's all been melded together into one giant, authoritarian, leftist scream."
          -Newman

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by scott View Post
            The issue isn't that a billionaire environmentalist gets to use his money, it's that the same people who take it are the ones screaming about other people using their money too.
            Oh, is that the issue? I could have sworn someone mentioned corruption earlier.
            Enjoy.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Norm dePlume View Post
              Oh, is that the issue? I could have sworn someone mentioned corruption earlier.
              Well there's that too.
              "Faith is nothing but a firm assent of the mind : which, if it be regulated, as is our duty, cannot be afforded to anything but upon good reason, and so cannot be opposite to it."
              -John Locke

              "It's all been melded together into one giant, authoritarian, leftist scream."
              -Newman

              Comment


              • #8
                A relevant essay was posted over the weekend.

                Straight into the Fox News buzzsaw: Why elite, billionaire liberalism always backfires

                Liberals rejoice. The former mayor of New York City, megabillionaire Michael Bloomberg, recently announced to the New York Times that he will spend some $50 million dollars on an effort to confront the National Rifle Association and advance background-check legislation for gun buyers. I’m a strong supporter of gun control, so hooray, I guess.

                What made the story worth noting was when the paper asked Bloomberg, one of the wealthiest men in the world, how much he planned to spend on the matter:
                …he tossed the $50 million figure out as if he were describing the tip he left on a restaurant check.

                “I put $50 million this year, last year into coal, $53 million into oceans,” he said with a shrug, describing his clean energy and sustainable fishing initiatives.

                This sounds remarkably nonchalant, even indifferent. The reader naturally wonders what motivates a man who has dumped so many millions over the years with so little concern about results.

                Thankfully, Bloomberg gives the answer a few paragraphs later. It seems he has been moved of late to contemplate mortality, and his political deeds—including, I suppose, his push for school “reform” and his wars on soda pop and cigarettes—are all undertaken with this problem in mind.
                “I am telling you if there is a God, when I get to heaven I’m not stopping to be interviewed. I am heading straight in. I have earned my place in heaven. It’s not even close.”

                It’s Pascal’s Wager updated for the age of Citizens United. If God exists, Bloomberg naturally wants to be prepared, and so he has put his money on the most glaringly virtuous politics available. He will advertise his goodness not as lesser men do—with hemp tote bags and locally made condiments and yoga in public places—but by overwhelming force of political spending, just as he did when persuading the people of New York City to give him a third term as mayor. His victory there in 2009 was probably a little too narrow for his taste, but this time around it will not even be close. He will spend more. He will be sure he gets premier status with this airline. And when the time comes he will flash his platinum card at the attendant with “St. Peter” on his nametag, and he will proceed directly to enjoy the rewards of a lifetime collecting righteousness miles.
                That's just the opener. There is more and better substance at Salon.
                Enjoy.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Norm dePlume View Post
                  A relevant essay was posted over the weekend.



                  That's just the opener. There is more and better substance at Salon.
                  Watched Cosmos last night. They did a bit on leaded gasoline. It was really depressing when I realized how government once actually functioned in a way that benefited the governed.
                  Colonel Vogel : What does the diary tell you that it doesn't tell us?

                  Professor Henry Jones : It tells me, that goose-stepping morons like yourself should try *reading* books instead of *burning* them!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    With Keystone XL’s delay, another controversial issue hits pause before the midterms

                    The State Department announced last week that it was extending the Keystone XL pipeline's five-year stay in purgatory — this time, indefinitely. A departmental review scheduled to end in May has been pushed back while the Nebraska Supreme Court decides a case that could affect the pipeline's path. It seems unlikely that the issue will be resolved before polls are cast in the 2014 midterms, meaning another controversial policy that could affect this year's closest Senate races is in limbo.

                    The first delays were, obviously, related to the Affordable Care Act. The employer mandate will not go into effect until after the midterms. The canceled plans that became one of the chief woes rankling Obamacare's rollout have been extended in states that allow it. The second period of open enrollment for 2015 will not start until after the November election. Many of these setbacks were necessitated by the creaky debut of the health-care program, but the timing was most definitely affected by Democrats' worries about their electoral fates.

                    The conservative 501(c)4 Americans for Prosperity has spent more than $7 million in campaign ads against North Carolina Sen. Kay Hagan (D), many revolving around her support for Obamacare. Americans for Prosperity has also run millions of dollars worth of anti-Obamacare ads aimed at Sens. Mark Begich (D-Alaska) and Mark Pryor (D-Ark.). All three senators pushed to extend open enrollment dates for the individual mandate. Louisiana Senator Mary Landrieu (D) — also facing a tough reelection this year — sponsored a bill that would let people on the notorious canceled health-insurance plans keep them. Her co-sponsors included Pryor, Hagan and Begich. Many Democrats argued against the delays, especially extending canceled plans, saying it could hinder the long-term success of the law and lead to higher premiums. When these senators know they'll be attacked for whatever happens to the Affordable Care Act between now and November, however, they seem to prefer having opinions on the law's effectiveness — whether positive or negative or wounded by their actions — kindly show themselves out until the holiday season arrives.

                    The Keystone XL pipeline, also beset by delays, sparks similarly heightened opinions, but has left these senators pushing for action instead of for policy lethargy — at least in public. After Friday's decision from the State Department, Landrieu — who chairs the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee — said, "This decision is irresponsible, unnecessary and unacceptable." Pryor released a statement saying, "When it comes to the Keystone XL pipeline, there's no excuse for another delay." Begich released a statement that said, “I am frankly appalled at the continued foot-dragging by this administration on the Keystone project." To each delay its own special snowflake of a response from the Senate Democrats most intent on taking the public's temperature before making any policy pronouncement this year. And if these senators are watching polling — and are most worried about pushback from conservatives — their respective stances on these issues seem to make sense.

                    According to a Washington Post-ABC News poll published March 31, 61 percent of conservatives oppose the Affordable Care Act. Despite the attention that Obamacare gets, conservatives are even more certain in their views about the tar sands pipeline. According to a Washington Post-ABC News poll published April 17, 75 percent of conservatives approve the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. If the Obama administration approved construction before the midterms, the Landrieus and Hagans of the Senate would have what they construe as a big fat win to show off against the pushback they've been receiving nonstop back home from many on the right, like the ads Americans for Prosperity ran claiming Begich supported a carbon tax and the ads run against Landrieu by the National Republican Senatorial Committee attacking her for not defending the oil and gas industry loudly enough.

                    However, it would be unwise to underestimate the wings of the Democratic Party who are as against the Keystone XL pipeline as many Republicans are against Obamacare — especially the environmental activists who have as much power to fund ad campaigns as Americans for Prosperity. Tom Steyer, who has said he plans to spend as much as $100 million during the 2014 midterms, said in February that he had not ruled out running ads against Landrieu for her views on energy and the environment. Some of Steyer's past campaign ads have been as controversial and scathing as any run by Americans for Prosperity. Landrieu has said Steyer's ads would probably help her chances at reelection.


                    More at Link
                    May we raise children who love the unloved things - the dandelion, the worm, the spiderlings.
                    Children who sense the rose needs the thorn and run into rainswept days the same way they turn towards the sun...
                    And when they're grown and someone has to speak for those who have no voice,
                    may they draw upon that wilder bond, those days of tending tender things and be the one.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      For the record, Steyer denies that he had anything to do with the Keystone delay.

                      BILL MAHER: Well, I am glad your checkbook is open. Because this week the Obama administration -- this is kind of a big story this week -- they said they are postponing indefinitely the decision on the Keystone Pipeline, which I know you oppose, I oppose. James Hansen said if we put all that carbon -- that we're going to dig out of the earth for that -- into the atmosphere, he said, 'game over' for the planet.

                      That's a good thing, right, postponing that indefinitely? Did you have something to do with that?

                      TOM STEYER: No. I think the president made a decision that he wanted to get all the information before he made a decision. There is no route right now through Nebraska because the way that they defined the route has been ruled by a judge to be illegal. So it's being appealed to the Nebraska Supreme Court.

                      And so realistically the president said, 'I can't approve a route that doesn't exist. I'm going to wait until it exists, when all of the information is in and then I'll make a considered opinion when the time comes.' I thought it was a very natural thing for the president to do.
                      His point about the route through Nebraska not being finalized checks out.

                      Judge nixes Keystone's Nebraska path

                      A Nebraska county judge struck down a law that would allow the controversial Keystone XL pipeline to run through the state.

                      Lancaster County Judge Stephanie Stacy's ruling Wednesday invalidated Gov. Dave Heineman's approval of the pipeline's route.

                      Stacy ruled that under the Major Oil Pipeline Siting Act, all routes must be evaluated and approved by the state's Public Service Commission, which regulates pipelines and other utilities.

                      The ruling may cause further delay in the process leading to a decision on the TransCanada pipeline, which would carry crude from Alberta to Gulf of Mexico refineries.
                      Enjoy.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Norm dePlume View Post
                        For the record, Steyer denies that he had anything to do with the Keystone delay.



                        His point about the route through Nebraska not being finalized checks out.
                        Yes, I'm sure Obama hasn't made/isn't making a political decision by delaying Keystone.
                        May we raise children who love the unloved things - the dandelion, the worm, the spiderlings.
                        Children who sense the rose needs the thorn and run into rainswept days the same way they turn towards the sun...
                        And when they're grown and someone has to speak for those who have no voice,
                        may they draw upon that wilder bond, those days of tending tender things and be the one.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by scott View Post
                          The issue isn't that a billionaire environmentalist gets to use his money, it's that the same people who take it are the ones screaming about other people using their money too.
                          Exactly.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X