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Bolz-Weber’s liberal, foulmouthed articulation of Christianity speaks to fed-up belie

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  • Bolz-Weber’s liberal, foulmouthed articulation of Christianity speaks to fed-up belie

    Bolz-Weber’s liberal, foulmouthed articulation of Christianity speaks to fed-up believers





    AUSTIN — Nadia Bolz-Weber bounds into the University United Methodist Church sanctuary like a superhero from Planet Alternative Christian. Her 6-foot-1 frame is plastered with tattoos, her arms are sculpted by competitive weightlifting and, to show it all off, this pastor is wearing a tight tank top and jeans.

    Looking out at the hundreds of people crowded into the pews to hear her present the gospel of Jesus Christ, she sees: Dockers and blazers. Sensible shoes. Grandmothers and soccer moms. Nary a facial piercing.

    To Bolz-Weber’s bafflement, this is now her congregation: mainstream America.

    These are the people who put her memoir near the top of the New York Times bestseller list the week it came out in September. They are the ones who follow her every tweet and Facebook post by the thousands, and who have made the Lutheran minister a budding star for the liberal Christian set.

    And who, as Bolz-Weber has described it in her frequently profane dialect, “are [mess]ing up my weird.”

    A quick tour through her 44 years doesn’t seem likely to wind up here. It includes teen rebellion against her family’s fundamentalist Christianity, a nose dive into drug and alcohol addiction, a lifestyle of sleeping around and a stint doing stand-up in a grungy Denver comedy club. She is part of society’s outsiders, she writes in her memoir, its “underside dwellers . . . cynics, alcoholics and queers.”
    "There are four lights!"

  • #2
    What the fuck?
    "There are four lights!"

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Billy Jingo View Post
      What the fuck?



      Gah! Gotta straighten up this color issue. Thought I had that corrected already.
      Bask in the warmth of the Deep South
      No one will be denied:
      Big law suits and bathroom toots;
      We're all getting Dixie-fried.
      But somewhere Hank and Lefty
      Are rollin' in their graves
      While kudzu vines grow over signs that read "Jesus Saves."

      Comment


      • #4
        I don't agree with some of the things she says but I have to say, there's a lot to agree with.

        I think the fascination with her type of evangelism is..fascinating. It's as if the authors of the article never heard of this type of thinking when it comes to faith. "


        This emphasis on experience over rules challenges conservatives, but it also bothers progressives who have turned church into what she views as essentially a nonprofit organization.
        I don't know where the author came up with the idea that when it comes to faith that conservative = rules. A better equivalent would be, imo, religious hierarchy = rules.
        May we raise children who love the unloved things - the dandelion, the worm, the spiderlings.
        Children who sense the rose needs the thorn and run into rainswept days the same way they turn towards the sun...
        And when they're grown and someone has to speak for those who have no voice,
        may they draw upon that wilder bond, those days of tending tender things and be the one.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Michele View Post

          I don't know where the author came up with the idea that when it comes to faith that conservative = rules. A better equivalent would be, imo, religious hierarchy = rules.
          I think it is rather easy to come to that conclusion. In the Episcopal Church (The Catholic Church with none of that weird Mary stuff), those who are considered conservative are obsessed with rules. So much so, we are undergoing a serious schism where diocese are trying to split off because communion is being given by priests who have committed the unpardonable sin of being born without a penis.
          "There are four lights!"

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't see the male priest issue as just a rule. It is a philosophy and practice that dates back to Christ himself, along with a a fundamental belief that the roles of men and women differ. To claim it is an obsession with "rules" is incredibly parochial.

            And what do you mean by "weird Mary stuff".

            Since I'm typing blindly due to the wonkiness of this forum, I apologize for any mistakes here.
            Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
            Robert Southwell, S.J.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by phillygirl View Post
              I don't see the male priest issue as just a rule. It is a philosophy and practice that dates back to Christ himself, along with a a fundamental belief that the roles of men and women differ. To claim it is an obsession with "rules" is incredibly parochial.
              And Philemon validates slavery.

              It is an issue of rules as opposed to how we interpret Matthew 22:37-40.

              And what do you mean by "weird Mary stuff".
              I was poking fun at you. I am very comfortable with the Catholic service. More so than any other.
              "There are four lights!"

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Billy Jingo View Post
                I think it is rather easy to come to that conclusion. In the Episcopal Church (The Catholic Church with none of that weird Mary stuff), those who are considered conservative are obsessed with rules. So much so, we are undergoing a serious schism where diocese are trying to split off because communion is being given by priests who have committed the unpardonable sin of being born without a penis.
                I can see where it's easy to come to that conclusion if you are part of a denominational church. I think there is a growing group of non-denominational Christians that look at denominations as churches who need rules/laws to follow..ie religion/religious. And, that's usually done by the hierarchy of the church.
                May we raise children who love the unloved things - the dandelion, the worm, the spiderlings.
                Children who sense the rose needs the thorn and run into rainswept days the same way they turn towards the sun...
                And when they're grown and someone has to speak for those who have no voice,
                may they draw upon that wilder bond, those days of tending tender things and be the one.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Billy Jingo View Post
                  And Philemon validates slavery.

                  It is an issue of rules as opposed to how we interpret Matthew 22:37-40.



                  I was poking fun at you. I am very comfortable with the Catholic service. More so than any other.
                  Are you able to see the post while typing? I can't.
                  Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
                  Robert Southwell, S.J.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by phillygirl View Post
                    Are you able to see the post while typing? I can't.
                    No. I just trust my typing.
                    "There are four lights!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Billy Jingo View Post
                      And Philemon validates slavery.

                      It is an issue of rules as opposed to how we interpret Matthew 22:37-40.



                      I was poking fun at you. I am very comfortable with the Catholic service. More so than any other.
                      Philemon may validate slavery, but that has nothing to do with the historical progression of priests or Christ's treatment with regards to same.

                      Mathew, as quoted, does not have anything to do with the giving or receiving of Communion, as far as I can see. Communion isI'm not sure how the Episcopalian treats Communion, but it is certainly a ritual that bears some thought with respect to who is giving it. Gender may or may not be a part of that process, depending on your philosophy, but it is not merely a "rule".

                      As for the Mary concept, I get that you were poking fun, but I really don't understand the issue of "weirdness". I must admit, though, I was an adult before I understood that Protestants did not treat or view Mary as Catholics do, and that always surprised me, given her role in Christianity.
                      Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
                      Robert Southwell, S.J.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by phillygirl View Post
                        Philemon may validate slavery, but that has nothing to do with the historical progression of priests or Christ's treatment with regards to same.

                        Mathew, as quoted, does not have anything to do with the giving or receiving of Communion, as far as I can see. Communion isI'm not sure how the Episcopalian treats Communion, but it is certainly a ritual that bears some thought with respect to who is giving it. Gender may or may not be a part of that process, depending on your philosophy, but it is not merely a "rule".
                        I really don't have a rebuttal since you seem to agree with me.

                        As for the Mary concept, I get that you were poking fun, but I really don't understand the issue of "weirdness". I must admit, though, I was an adult before I understood that Protestants did not treat or view Mary as Catholics do, and that always surprised me, given her role in Christianity.
                        And Islam.
                        "There are four lights!"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Billy Jingo View Post
                          I think it is rather easy to come to that conclusion. In the Episcopal Church (The Catholic Church with none of that weird Mary stuff), those who are considered conservative are obsessed with rules. So much so, we are undergoing a serious schism where diocese are trying to split off because communion is being given by priests who have committed the unpardonable sin of being born without a penis.
                          You can't even get basic Catholicism right.

                          Why do you even bother discussing issues?
                          "Faith is nothing but a firm assent of the mind : which, if it be regulated, as is our duty, cannot be afforded to anything but upon good reason, and so cannot be opposite to it."

                          -John Locke

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Michele View Post
                            I can see where it's easy to come to that conclusion if you are part of a denominational church. I think there is a growing group of non-denominational Christians that look at denominations as churches who need rules/laws to follow..ie religion/religious. And, that's usually done by the hierarchy of the church.
                            There aren't a w hole lot of churches that are non-denominational. The thing is denominations or not, we need people to be less judgmental. Oh, and stop acting like God is registered with the Board of Elections. It's not just some conservatives I see doing it. I've seen liberals doing it online as well.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by phillygirl View Post

                              As for the Mary concept, I get that you were poking fun, but I really don't understand the issue of "weirdness". I must admit, though, I was an adult before I understood that Protestants did not treat or view Mary as Catholics do, and that always surprised me, given her role in Christianity.
                              Protestants do respect Mary. It's just that they don't pray to her. Most Protestants don't believe in the communion of saints. They still respect Mary though.

                              Comment

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