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EVANGELII GAUDIUM

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  • EVANGELII GAUDIUM

    EVANGELII GAUDIUM

    ...

    56. While the earnings of a minority are growing exponentially, so too is the gap separating the majority from the prosperity enjoyed by those happy few. This imbalance is the result of ideologies which defend the absolute autonomy of the marketplace and financial speculation. Consequently, they reject the right of states, charged with vigilance for the common good, to exercise any form of control. A new tyranny is thus born, invisible and often virtual, which unilaterally and relentlessly imposes its own laws and rules. Debt and the accumulation of interest also make it difficult for countries to realize the potential of their own economies and keep citizens from enjoying their real purchasing power. To all this we can add widespread corruption and self-serving tax evasion, which have taken on worldwide dimensions. The thirst for power and possessions knows no limits. In this system, which tends to devour everything which stands in the way of increased profits, whatever is fragile, like the environment, is defenseless before the interests of a deified market, which become the only rule.

    No to a financial system which rules rather than serves

    57. Behind this attitude lurks a rejection of ethics and a rejection of God. Ethics has come to be viewed with a certain scornful derision. It is seen as counterproductive, too human, because it makes money and power relative. It is felt to be a threat, since it condemns the manipulation and debasement of the person. In effect, ethics leads to a God who calls for a committed response which is outside of the categories of the marketplace. When these latter are absolutized, God can only be seen as uncontrollable, unmanageable, even dangerous, since he calls human beings to their full realization and to freedom from all forms of enslavement. Ethics – a non-ideological ethics – would make it possible to bring about balance and a more humane social order. With this in mind, I encourage financial experts and political leaders to ponder the words of one of the sages of antiquity: “Not to share one’s wealth with the poor is to steal from them and to take away their livelihood. It is not our own goods which we hold, but theirs”.[55]
    "There are four lights!"

  • #2
    Wow.

    God stands in the way of communists and capitalists alike.
    "There are four lights!"

    Comment


    • #3
      So we should share our wealth with the poor, voluntarily. We should not rely on others to do it for us. We should keep to good ethics when profiting. We should not rely on the market to dictate ethics to us.


      Quite profound.
      "Faith is nothing but a firm assent of the mind : which, if it be regulated, as is our duty, cannot be afforded to anything but upon good reason, and so cannot be opposite to it."

      -John Locke

      Comment


      • #4
        64. The process of secularization tends to reduce the faith and the Church to the sphere of the private and personal. Furthermore, by completely rejecting the transcendent, it has produced a growing deterioration of ethics, a weakening of the sense of personal and collective sin, and a steady increase in relativism. These have led to a general sense of disorientation, especially in the periods of adolescence and young adulthood which are so vulnerable to change. As the bishops of the United States of America have rightly pointed out, while the Church insists on the existence of objective moral norms which are valid for everyone, “there are those in our culture who portray this teaching as unjust, that is, as opposed to basic human rights. Such claims usually follow from a form of moral relativism that is joined, not without inconsistency, to a belief in the absolute rights of individuals. In this view, the Church is perceived as promoting a particular prejudice and as interfering with individual freedom”.[59] We are living in an information-driven society which bombards us indiscriminately with data – all treated as being of equal importance – and which leads to remarkable superficiality in the area of moral discernment. In response, we need to provide an education which teaches critical thinking and encourages the development of mature moral values.
        Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
        Robert Southwell, S.J.

        Comment


        • #5
          I may try to read the whole thing this weekend. There's a lot in there that requires reflection.
          Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
          Robert Southwell, S.J.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by phillygirl View Post
            64. The process of secularization tends to reduce the faith and the Church to the sphere of the private and personal. Furthermore, by completely rejecting the transcendent, it has produced a growing deterioration of ethics, a weakening of the sense of personal and collective sin, and a steady increase in relativism. These have led to a general sense of disorientation, especially in the periods of adolescence and young adulthood which are so vulnerable to change. As the bishops of the United States of America have rightly pointed out, while the Church insists on the existence of objective moral norms which are valid for everyone, “there are those in our culture who portray this teaching as unjust, that is, as opposed to basic human rights. Such claims usually follow from a form of moral relativism that is joined, not without inconsistency, to a belief in the absolute rights of individuals. In this view, the Church is perceived as promoting a particular prejudice and as interfering with individual freedom”.[59] We are living in an information-driven society which bombards us indiscriminately with data – all treated as being of equal importance – and which leads to remarkable superficiality in the area of moral discernment. In response, we need to provide an education which teaches critical thinking and encourages the development of mature moral values.
            Originally posted by phillygirl View Post
            I may try to read the whole thing this weekend. There's a lot in there that requires reflection.
            I agree. An amazing document so far. Your above excerpt looks to be a veiled criticism of the Cult of the Individual.
            "There are four lights!"

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by scott View Post
              So we should share our wealth with the poor, voluntarily. We should not rely on others to do it for us. We should keep to good ethics when profiting. We should not rely on the market to dictate ethics to us.


              Quite profound.
              I am happy that you voluntarily refrain from burning the Cuyahoga.
              "There are four lights!"

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by scott View Post
                So we should share our wealth with the poor, voluntarily. We should not rely on others to do it for us. We should keep to good ethics when profiting. We should not rely on the market to dictate ethics to us.


                Quite profound.
                Yup... just like the Bible says. It's too bad that people have to issue long papers saying these kind of things, when a short statement like "read and follow the Bible" would suffice. Heck, if people don't want to read it all, just read Proverbs - that pretty well covers it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Billy Jingo View Post
                  I agree. An amazing document so far. Your above excerpt looks to be a veiled criticism of the Cult of the Individual.
                  I actually read it to criticize the moral relativism that has been rampant in this country (and I presume the world).
                  Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
                  Robert Southwell, S.J.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by phillygirl View Post
                    I actually read it to criticize the moral relativism that has been rampant in this country (and I presume the world).
                    More specifically, "a form of moral relativism that is joined ... to a belief in the absolute rights of individuals."
                    Enjoy.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Norm dePlume View Post
                      More specifically, "a form of moral relativism that is joined ... to a belief in the absolute rights of individuals."
                      Yeah...that's why I need to set aside some time this weekend and try to really read it for comprehension.
                      Not where I breathe, but where I love, I live...
                      Robert Southwell, S.J.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Billy Jingo View Post
                        I am happy that you voluntarily refrain from burning the Cuyahoga.
                        You just couldn't help yourself.
                        "Faith is nothing but a firm assent of the mind : which, if it be regulated, as is our duty, cannot be afforded to anything but upon good reason, and so cannot be opposite to it."

                        -John Locke

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Norm dePlume View Post
                          More specifically, "a form of moral relativism that is joined ... to a belief in the absolute rights of individuals."
                          I wonder if he's talking about abortions or guns.
                          "Faith is nothing but a firm assent of the mind : which, if it be regulated, as is our duty, cannot be afforded to anything but upon good reason, and so cannot be opposite to it."

                          -John Locke

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by scott View Post
                            You just couldn't help yourself.
                            Come on, scott. What you said was absurd.
                            "There are four lights!"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by scott View Post
                              I wonder if he's talking about abortions or guns.

                              I believe he's intentionally working at a higher level of abstraction and he wouldn't have any problem whatsoever mentioning abortion or guns if that's what he meant to say.
                              Enjoy.

                              Comment

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